sitemap JUSTIN MORRILL COLLEGE: JMC COURSES
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Funny... I don't feel dead! If you've forgotten JMC - You weren't there!

 
1965
 
 
 
1979
An academy for wandering minstrels
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* Michigan State University's first, most experimental, and most innovative residential college *
JUSTIN MORRILL COLLEGE COURSES
 
Justin Morrill College's unique character was reflected in the uniquely creative and interesting nature of its internal course offerings.

This Webpage offers a representative overview of the courses created and taught within Justin Morrill College.

JMC's internal courses were focused on a specific topic or theme within the humanities, social sciences, or natural sciences. In accordance with JMC's pedagogical philosophy of 'heuristic learning', course content was geared to an advanced student (i.e., introductory elements were presumed or left to the student to pick up along the way). This, combined with small class size, made JMC courses more like graduate seminars than undergraduate lecture classes.

The JMC Course Descriptions issued each quarter were the sole documentation of JMC course offerings and content. Unfortunately, very few of these Course Description documents survived. Between personal and MSU University archives, only 5 or 6 are known to exist. As a result, much of the evidence for JMC's courses is limited to the memories of those who took them.

This page is a compilation of JMC courses drawn from alumni memories (e.g., culled from the JMC email forum at Yahoo Groups) and from the official JMC Course Descriptions issued during Fall 1972 as well as the whole 1973 / 1974 academic year. This is the only 'whole year' for which such documentation is known to exist.

If anyone has additional information on JMC, its operations, its performance, or its outcomes, please Contact the Editor.
 

 

HERE ON THIS PAGE:

  • JMC course listings: Fall 1972
     
  • JMC course listings: Fall 1973 through Spring 1974
     
  • Background descriptions of course categories
     
  • JMC alumni reminiscences of selected courses


RELATED MATERIAL ELSEWHERE:

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OVERVIEW
- From the Winter 1974 JMC Course Descriptions

 
"The Justin Morrill College Curriculum is designed to give students a general / liberal education using as a means to that end various courses taught within the traditional divisions of knowledge: social science, humanities, and natural science, in addition to special programs in foreign language, composition, and field study. Each JMC course serves the general college mission in its own way. For example, to meet the general / liberal purposes of humanities, we offer specific courses in disciplines such as literature and history, and within these disciplines, specific topics such as "Hemingway and Faulkner" and "The History of India". These specific topics serve to introduce JMC students to the general knowledge of skills nad insights of both the humanities and of general / liberal education."

 


ANTHROPOLOGY:  JMC 255A (Overview)

 
"Study in the discipline of Anthropology with selected periods, cultures, topics and schools. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973

"An introduction to the work and interests of anthropologists, for the purpose of providing general education in the social sciences."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


ANTHROPOLOGY:
Primitive Religions and the Anthropology of Mass Culture
Robert McKinley, Fall 1973

 
"The course will deal with the anthropological approach to symbol systems of primitive societies, primitive religions and ritual. From a consideration of these materials, there will be an attempt to extend the analysis of primitive religion to contemporary culture."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


ANTHROPOLOGY:
The Anthropology of Music
Ed Henry, Spring 1974

 
"How can we study what a society's music means to its members and to the operation of the society? What determines the content and form of a society's music, and what aspects of the music are significant to its members? How does music links and reflect other aspects of a society's culture? These are several of the problems which will orient this course. Class time will be taken up with lectures, listening to both Western and non-Western music, and discussions. Objectives will be to familiarize ourselves with major Anthropological studies of music and to learn how to appreciate music of other cultures. Evaluation will be based on individual projects and a final examination."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


ANTHROPOLOGY:
Race, Class and Power in Southern Africa
Bill Derman, Spring 1974

 
"Unlike the northern 2/3's of Africa, the southern 1/3 remains under the control of Europeans or those of European origin. The class will focus on the Portuguese areas of Mozambique and Angola where classical wars of liberation are being fought, and on the Republic of South Africa itself, well known for its system of racial separation (apartheid). The first part of the course will focus on the indigenous background prior to colonial rules, the second on the basis and conduct of colonial rule, and the third, last, but most emphasized, the nature of African responses to the continued colonial rule.

Readings from Mondlane, Davidson, Minter and others."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


DOMESTIC FIELD STUDY: JMC 400B (Overview)

 
"A program in cross-cultural education involving a three term process of preparation seminar, a twelve week field experience, and follow-up seminar. The preparation seminar consists of simulated cross-cultural experiences, the development of techniques for learning about new social environments through a day-in-the-field, introduction to values clarification processes, the development of a learning contract, and the development of critical incident writing skills focused on the objectives of the program. While on the project the student keeps a journal and writes up twelve critical incidents. The return seminar consists of student interviews using values clarification processes and a final paper in which the student reports the results of his field study in terms of the knowledge he gained of another culture, his own and the self-knowledge he gained as well as the changes, if any, which the experience brought about in the student's attitudes, values, interests, goals, beliefs, or convictions. Students planning to do field study within the United States should enroll and register for 400B .... Plans for projects to satisfy the 12 credit domestic field study ... requirements must be approved by the field study office before the project is undertaken and before enrolling. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


ECONOMICS: JMC 253A: (Overview)

 
"Study in the discipline of economics with selected schools, economies, areas, and topics. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


ECONOMICS:
Introduction to Community Economics
James Shaffer and Marc Johnson, Fall 1973

 
"Identification and analysis of problems faced by public decision makers in managing public revenues and services and making rules controlling private resource use. Impact of political and economic structures on revenue use. Case studies are utilized to simulate the role of a professional public affairs staff analyst."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


ECONOMICS:
Consumer Cooperatives
Jim Jones, Winter 1974

 
"Three-fourths of the farmers in the United States are involved with cooperatives, and about 20 million citizens hold membership in credit unions. Closer to home, about 350 students now live in housing cooperatives at MSU, and hundreds more purchase food cooperatively through Green Earth Food Coop. The major problem they all face is a lack of knowledge and understanding of basic cooperative principles and organization. This course will examine cooperative theory, organization and history and will include several sessions on coop developmental skills. Numerous speakers will be invited to the class, and there will be several optional field trips. The later part of the class will have a group project orientation, with each group planning a cooperative to satisfy some need of the urban community. Both the product and the process of this planning will be considered in the course evaluation. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


FIELD EDUCATION PROGRAM IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND THE ARTS (Overview)

 
Editor's Note: Within the Fall 1972 Course Descriptions are a cluster of Field education projects being undertaken under the aegis of individual JMC topical / disciplinary courses. Below is the general description of the course concept.

"The following course offerings were designed primarily by students with the cooperation of faculty and people from Lansing area communities. Three important elements characterize the Field Education courses:

  1. Students have exercised the opportunity to name issues or topics of their own choice and design a course or project around them.
  2. These courses or projects related to the 'real' world of the Lansing area and depend heavily on involvement with people and organizations outside the University.
  3. The courses afford a change to learn from people outside the university and at the same time a chance to serve those people in concrete ways.

Please talk to the student coordinator or faculty consultant before electing one of the following courses to ensure that your expections will be met by the course. If you are interested in helping design courses other than the four listed below please contact the Field Education Office..."

The Field Education sections listed in the Fall 1972 offerings were:

  • Feasibility of Total Paper Recycling for the MSU Campus (cf. JMC 229A - Interdisiplinary studies in Nat Sci)
  • Politics '72 - Voter Project (cf. JMC 252A - Political Science)
  • Inside Government (cf. JMC 252A - Political Science)
  • Chicano Community Projects (cf. JMC 389B - Interdisciplinary Special Topics).
"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


FINE ARTS:  JMC 234A (Overview)

 
"Study in the disciplines of the fine arts with selected artists, schools, periods, and genres. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Spring 1974
 


FINE ARTS:  INDEPENDENT STUDY: JMC 234B (Overview)

 
Independent study in the field of Fine Arts. Sometimes used as an adjunct to a 234A Fine Arts course. For example (cf. Wards's 'What's So Special About Being an Artist?', Spring 1974):

"An independent study will be required in conjunction with 234A, Section 1 to allow each student to pursue an area of interest relevant to the focus of the course. They study is to be designed by the student and approved by the instructor."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Architecture Appreciation(Precise Title Unknown)
Alec Butler, Fall 1969

 
There was one JMC elective that I signed up for simply because the course description sounded so different from anything I had ever taken before. It was Dr. Alec Butler's course on architecture appreciation offered, I believe, Fall term, 1969. Dr. Butler taught Fine Arts in the University. I signed up for it in part because I remembered having blown the architecture questions on the Alumni Distinguished Scholarship exam I took as a high school senior. (Chuck Humphreys and Richard Foster also signed up for the class.)

In addition to general design principles such as the use of light and shadow, we studied the works of Mies van der Rohe, LeCorbusier, and Frank Lloyd Wright. We learned that the Seagrams building in New York was Mies' masterpiece but that it was an economic failure -- the rent lost due to the building's setback from the street, which provided the plaza across which to appreciate the structure, made it unprofitable. The same was soon to be the case with the Sydney Opera House -- too much architecture and not enough revenue-producing seats. Wright's houses designed to harmonize with the landscape were difficult to maintain, although a hotel he built in Japan withstood an earthquake when most other buildings around it collapsed. LeCorbusier designed based on (the French spelling escapes me) The Modular, a concept in which elements of large buildings were scaled to human proportions. The Department of Housing and Urban Development, which stands across the street from the building where I work in SW DC, is a poor knock-off of his style. But LeCorbusier's gem is a chapel at Ronchamps.

My class project was a black-and-white photo study of St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church, which stands a mile from my family's home in Muskegon...

Dr. Butler illustrated his lectures with slides he had taken all over the world. He also had a keen sense of humor. He told us that the slides we saw on the exam -- that's right, see the slide and write about it quick -- would be selected from slides he showed during class. Most of his slides were of beautiful, distinctive buildings from every age. One, however, was of a drugstore in Helsinki that appeared as though it had been designed by committee and for which funds had run out during its construction. Naturally, that slide was in the final, and those of us who had seen the slide in class chuckled and wrote furiously while those who hadn't seen the slide before simply looked stunned.

Dr. Butler threw a big party at his home after the final, and he was a gracious host. For pure enjoyment -- then and in later life -- that was my finest course in JMC. Every time I'm in a new neighborhood or environment I'm seeing buildings in ways I couldn't see them before I took that course.

I meant for years to thank Dr. Butler for that gift, but I learned from Dr. Fred Graham in a phone call while I was at the Reunion that Dr. Butler had passed away several years ago. Thank people while you can...

- Charley Roberts, December 2002
 


FINE ARTS:
Music Theory for Non-Music Majors
Barbara Ward, Fall 1972

 
"This course will assist students in developing basic music skills, assuming little or no prior study of music theory. We will work with rhythms, melodies and harmonies, allowing each student to move at his own rate after some preliminary shared experiences. A basic music vocabulary will be identified. Students will be encouraged to read simple scores of music and will be introduced to the piano keyboard as a tool for understanding theoretical structures. ...

Music majors or students with an area of concentration in music will not be enrolled in the course."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


FINE ARTS:
Anthology of American Music
Barbara Ward, Fall 1972

 
"Music has come to the U.S.A. with almost every immigrant, slave, pilgrim, and visitor. Through our relatively short history, we have adapted and varied it to fit our needs, experiences, situations, tastes and talents. American composers have drawn from this melting pot to create music which has been recognized as being indigenous to the country, which reflects our past and propels us into the future.

It is the purpose of this course (1) to identify and examine the wide variety of musical styles in America today (especially jazz, blues, folks and classical forms), (2) to trace the evolution of each of these styles, (3) to identify and introduce American composers and to listen to their works and (4) to aid in understanding our musical heritage and in appreciating our musical potential.

The class will be conducted seminar fashion and is designed to encourage each student to contribute whatever musical knowledge or interest he has. No previous training in music is assumed."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


FINE ARTS:
Creativity or Conformity?
Barbara Ward, Fall 1972

 
"Many of the pressures exerted on contemporary man lead toward an acceptance of conformity as the norm. When no viable outlet for individuality is apparent, man frequently succumbs to 'the system' and in doing so, gives up claim to some of his humanness.

This class will attempt to identify and understand some of the existing social, political, sexual and economic pressures exerted on man and then will consider personal creativity as an alternative to conformity. Potentials in the arts will be explored as freeing and humanizing factors in a search for individuality and expression. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


FINE ARTS:
The World's Great Filmmakers
Jim Yousling, Fall 1972

 
"A survey of the major film industries throughout the world, combining lectures, film viewing and discussion, with emphasis on outstanding directors. The histories of the individual industries will be traced, but emphasis will be place on films from the Sixties. Filmmakers to be studied in depth include Frederico Fellini (Italy), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), Ingmar Bergman (Sweden), Luis Bunuel (Spain), Jean-Luc Godard (France), Zagreb Films (Yugoslavia) and Orson Welles (USA).

Students will be expected to have Wednesday night and either Tuesday or Thursday night free for viewing feature films. Some short films will also be shown during class hours.

The technical side of filmmaking will be covered as well as the aesthetic side, and students may make their own films to fulfill the term-project requirement if they wish. ... "

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


FINE ARTS:
Music in the 20th Century
Barbara Ward, Fall 1973

 
"Composers in the 20th Century have used new techniques of organizing and producing sound to express a wider range of musical ideas and aesthetic philosophies than those of any previous period. This course will examine the great upheaval in musical styles which began around 1900, some of the newer concepts of sound and time and the new demands placed on listeners. Stravinsky, Bartok, Schoenberg, Partch, Cage and electronic equipment are a few of the resources for this study."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


FINE ARTS:
Newer Forms in the Arts
Barbara Ward, Fall 1973

 
"This course will provide an opportunity to look at some of the emerging art forms in the general areas of music, dance, theatre and the visual arts. We will use whatever resources are available for our initial study and then will attempt to simulate or imitate various techniques studied to see how they feel or work or sound. Absolutely no previous experience with any of these forms is necessary. The essential prerequisite for enrollment is a willingness to create appropriate new modes of self expression and to respond constructively to those of other students."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


FINE ARTS:
The Sounds of Music
Barbara Ward, Fall 1973

 
"This class is offered to encourage the development of discriminating listening to music and to highlight the unique characteristics of major musical periods and styles. All major forms of music dating from about 515 to the present will be studied. Learning how to recognize musical themes and their developments, how to approach a new piece of music and what to expect at a concert will be a part of the term's study. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


FINE ARTS:
Masks of Tragedy & Comedy: The Experience of Ancient Greek Drama
Sears Eldredge, Fall 1973

 
"Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes were supreme craftsmen as playwrights as well as being profound thinkers on the human condition. Each has his own style and statement. The extent of their greatness is best perceived as one becomes aware of their dramas as performance pieces which necessitated the masked actor, the chorus, and the staging methods of the 5th century Athens.

One of the most frustrating things about a dramatic literature class is that you talk about the plays as separate from their fulfillment in performance; you discuss the ideas of the plays apart from the experience that the plays give you, which is their main function. This course will try to correct that problem by having the class divided into groups which will present episodes from the ancient Greek plays. In this way the student will more fully confront the script and its implications and provide the group with a departure point for a more intelligent discussion.

One theory we will test out is that the plays take on their full significance and statue only if the actors are masked; that the playwright did not see the masks as obstacles to the enjoyment of his plays but as their necessary completion; that the plays were written with the complete understanding of what the masks could and could not do onstage.

Each member of the class will be making the mask for the character(s) he will portray in the episodes. Students taking the course should expect, then, to spend time in mask making and rehearsal as a large part of their homework assignment."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


FINE ARTS:
Theature Practicum I: Beginning Acting
Sears Eldredge, Fall 1973 (?-Fall 1974, too-?)

 
"This course will be devoated to the principles and techniques of the realistic acting style. Through the use of exercises and improvisations, students will be made aware of their abilities to express themselves physically and emotionally. Further work will involve more structured material and each student will be cast in a number of scenes from the modern realistic theatre.

This course is based on the assumption that those students entering the program have had little or no training in acting, but are interested in exploring this means of expression and self-discovery."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


FINE ARTS:
Impressionism
Barbara Ward, Winter 1974

 
"This class is designed to encourage better perception of the music and visual arts which we now label as Impressionistic. Definition of this movement or style will be pursued in terms of its place in history, its aesthetic philosophies and techniques. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Four Asian Film Makers
Sears Eldredge, Winter 1974

 
"During the past 20 years, Asian films and film makers have become some of the most repsected cinema artists in the world. In this course we will examine four of the Asian film directors responsible: Satyajit Ray (India), Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, and Yasujiro Ozu (all of Japan). ...

Students in this lecture-discussion course will be able to see two films by each of these four Asian directors (except Mizoguchi), thus giving them a chance to observe their individual styles and their major concerns as artists. In addition to the films shown in class, it is hoped that the students will take advantage of the Asian Film Series on campus sponsored by the Asian Studies Center. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Theatre Practicum II: Play Production on a Shoestring
Sears Eldredge, Winter 1974

 
"This course is designed for those students who want to know more about how to put on a play with very limited resources. It will deal mainly with the techniques of the director and his work with the actor but will also include some basic material on lighting, staging, costuming, etc. Students will work with each other in the course as actors and directors until the final. Then they will be expected to cast their final scene with students from outside the class. All students will have use of the same lighting and stage equipment for their final presentation."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Introduction to Dance
Barbara Rutledge, Winter 1974 / Spring 1974

 
"This course is designed to introduce students to the practical, critical, historical, and esthetic aspects of dance. There will be studio participation in problems of physical development, choreography and styles. Each student will contribute a research project in dance history or theory and will attend films and dance performances. Ballet, modern, primitive, and show dance forms will be considered."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974 / Spring 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Theatre in Miniature - Accent Marionettes
John Sutton and Philip Molby, Winter 1974

 
"...This is a performing arts course which will be production oriented. Some history and theory will be added, but emphasis will be on production. The student will choose either a dramatic, operatic or Broadway vignette as his final project. These scenes will be done individually or in groups and will be presented to a live audience. The student will be responsible for designing and building a marionette. Attendance will be mandatory. The quality of work will depend on you and how much extra practice you put in. Evaluation will be based on your active participation in class, quality of your production and ability to work as a group. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
What's So Special About Being an Artist?
Barbara Ward, Spring 1974

 
"...Through the biographies of selected artists (including Picasso, Stravinsky, Casals, Lahr and others) the class will attempt to identify and explicate those qualities of human-ness shared by these men, raising questions about the role of the artists, the critics and the audience in contemporary society. Local artists will be invited to meet with the class to talk personally about their forms of artistic expression and the importance of that outlet to their lives. The class will require reading, writing, thinking, question formulation and participation in discussions. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Ludwig van Beethoven: His Life and Music
Barbara Ward, Spring 1974

 
"...This class will concern itself with a study of his life, his works and his genius. Primary focus will be on an understanding and analysis of his symphonies.

Some previous experience with music would be helpful to students enrolling in this course, although it is not a prerequisite."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Styles of Documentary Film
Sears Eldredge, Spring 1974

 
"What is a documentary film? How does it differ in its aims and methods from theatrical entertainment film? How much does the film maker impose his own ideas through his choice of what to photograph and how he then edits his material; thereby manipulating what his audience feels and thinks about his subject? Many film makers believe that the best way to learn about film is through a study of documentary film making techniques. This course will try to provide such an examination through the exhibition and discussion of various styles of famous documentary films. These will include Robert Flaherty's Moana of the South Seas paired with F. W. Murnau's pseudo-documentary, Tabu. The ethnological film, Dead Birds, will also be shown. Among the examples of documentary propaganda films will be Leni Riefenstahl's great film for the German government, Olympia. Britain's Scott of the Antarctic will represent the attempt at historical reconstruction. And one of the cinema verite films will be Shirley Clarke's penetrating study of a homosexual, Portrait of Jason.

Students taking the course can make brief documentary films of their own instead of writing a research paper as fulfillment of the class requirements."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Theatre Practicum III: Workshop / Performance
Sears Eldredge, Spring 1974

 
"Once again a descent into the unknown! The Theatre Practicum course this term will be a workshop devoted to a performance of material from an ancient Quiche Mayan epic, The Popol Vuh. This great epic is composed of four creation stories with various delightful tales of gods, humans, and animals. We will not try to stage the whole epic, but only certain sections of it. Because the original material is not in playscript form, the whole group will be involved in shaping and evolving the material into a performance. This will demand working closely together in an ensemble approach. Aspects of the performance will include music, speech, dance, and puppetry, as well as acting. The movement-dance and musical segments will require not only learning some available Latin American materials, but also devising our own, through experimentation. We will also be making our costumes, masks, and musical instruments for the performance.

The performance will not be an attempt at historical reconstruction of a Mayan drama, but a modern adaptation and improvisation on the ancient materials that will stress its mythic and archetypal content.

Students taking the course will be expected to be involved in all aspects of the production. A few students will be allowed to take the course just to work on the mask making, costuming, and property crews if they so desire. ... Those students taking the full program need not have any background in theatre but only a willingness to experiment and to work in an ensemble. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


FINE ARTS:
Art Practice: An Adventure in Time and Color
Tamara Harrod, Spring 1974

 
"...The course proposes to challenge you, to nudge you out of habitual cliches of seeing. Its aim is to provide you with the incentive to go further on your own initiative.

We will be more concerned with exploring the process of drawing or painting with spontaneity, feeling and confidence than with producing a specific project. The class period will be devoted to experiments in expressive drawing. Working with charcoal, ink, crayon and watercolor, you'll learn to capture may aspects of reality: weight, volume, structure, movement, etc. ...Our subjects will be the human body, still-life and interiors.

I'll expect you to develop this work outside of the classroom. At the end of the term, your work must show growth and change. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


FOREIGN FIELD STUDY: JMC 400C (Overview)

 
"A program in cross-cultural education involving a three term process of preparation seminar, a twelve week field experience, and follow-up seminar. The preparation seminar consists of simulated cross-cultural experiences, the development of techniques for learning about new social environments through a day-in-the-field, introduction to values clarification processes, the development of a learning contract, and the development of critical incident writing skills focused on the objectives of the program. While on the project the student keeps a journal and writes up twelve critical incidents. The return seminar consists of student interviews using values clarification processes and a final paper in which the student reports the results of his field study in terms of the knowledge he gained of another culture, his own and the self-knowledge he gained as well as the changes, if any, which the experience brought about in the student's attitudes, values, interests, goals, beliefs, or convictions. Students planning ... on going outside the country should enroll and register for 400C .... Plans for projects to satisfy the 12 credit ... foreign field study ... requirements must be approved by the field study office before the project is undertaken and before enrolling. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


GEOGRAPHY:  JMC 254A (Overview)

 
"Study in the discipline of Geography with selected areas of the world, cultures, topics, and issues."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


GEOGRAPHY:  JMC 254B (Overview)

 
"Independent study in geography."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


GEOGRAPHY:
World Regional Geography
Gary Manson, Fall 1972

 
"This course shows how geographic theory and methodology relates to social problems having spatial or environmental dimensions. We take up urbanization, population, economic development and ecological imbalances in order to show how geographers have, or in other cases how they might contributed to resolving these issues. Multi-media, field research and case studies are the most salient teaching / learning aspects of the course. Representative lecture titles are: An Ecological View of the Florida Everglades; Economics, Ethics, Esthetics and the Environment; Los Angeles, California; The Diffusion of Innovation in East Africa.

Students must take .... JMC 254B concurrently."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


GEOGRAPHY:
World Regional Geography
Ian Matley, Winter 1974

 
"Analysis of the world's major natural habitats and man's relation to them. Course also offered as GEO 204. Students enrolled for JMC 254A must also enroll for JMC 254B for 1 credit."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


GEOGRAPHY:
World Regional Geography
Gary Manson, Spring 1974

 
"This course uses geographic concepts and methods to develop an integrated overview of the major cultural regions of the world. Included are ideas and techniques used in examining cities, man-environment relationships, spatial organization of society, and population-resource problems.

Opportunities for exploring special interests are provided; presently this include computer simulation of land use models, use of topographic maps, and geography in the schools.

Textbook: Harm de Blij, Geography: Regions and Concepts ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


HISTORY: JMC 230A (Overview)

 
"Study of the discipline of History with selected periods, areas and topics. Students may re-enroll once with the different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Spring 1974
 


HISTORY:
Romanticism and Revolt
Roy Matthews, 1969 (?)

 

- Cited by Bill Trevarthen, JMC Yahoo Forum, September 2002
 


HISTORY:
European History (? - Precise Title Unknown)
Roy Matthews, Fall 1969

 

- Cited by Bob Walter, JMC Yahoo Forum, September 2002
 


HISTORY:
History of Islam (? - Precise Title Unknown)
Fauzi Najjar, 1970 or 1971?

 
"Professor Najjar was a regular visiting instructor on the Middle East and Islamic topics. He was quite 'old school' - always nattily dressed and always prepared to give a formal lecture, day in and day out. I also remember that he seemed to be personally acquainted with most all the Islamic scholars whose work was cited or reviewed in the class.

It would be fair to say this class was conventional (i.e., not peculiarly 'JMC') in form and content. However, the small class size (maybe 15 - 20 students) afforded us the opportunity for limited class discussion with this very knowledgeable scholar. I remember my individual project / paper was focused on Sufism. All in all, a very solid class in the traditional mold..."

- Randy Whitaker, October 2003
 


HISTORY:
Doing History
Milt Powell, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973

 
"Most history courses are about history. This one is for students who want to do history. The basic idea is similar to that of a laboratory course in science. Instead of learning from lectures and books about what happened in a particular period, students in this course will be expected to choose a particular event, find the documents that describe it, and then reconstruct the event. You may be doubtful, but I assure you it can be done. The discipline of history does not require you to learn a new language, and documents are more accessible than you suspect. If there is an event you'd like to know more about, this is the place to do it. Or you can choose from specific projects I will suggest. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973
 


HISTORY:
Experiencing the Experience of Minorities in America
Milt Powell and Jackie Wilson, Fall 1972

 
"Has the American dream in reality been the American nightmare for millions of her citizens? What prompts the cries for liberation and freedom, the accusations of oppression, repression and suppression? What in fact has been the experience of women, Indians, blacks and immigrants in America? Does history indicate that there are similarities, differences in the experience of these groups? How can we account for the persistence of the claims of oppression? This course is designed to examine these questions in depth. Regular attendance is requested since games designed to intensify the learning experience will be incorporated as an essential part of the course. We will read a minimum of two books and several articles."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


HISTORY:
Contemporary China
Barbara Haimes (Milt Powell, Supervisor), Fall 1972

 
"We hear about scattered events in China, analyzing them in a vacuum, rarely getting a sense of the trends evolving in modern China. This course's goal will be to examine China's development since the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in order to understand how this country is dealing with the challenge of the present, and how it is working towards the future.

We will be reading only one text, plus some selections from Mao's works, and articles from both Western and Chinese periodicals. The articles, plus guest speakers are designed to provided a truly current picture of China, and to foster an understanding of how Mao's thought is being implemented daily to approach economic, social, and cultural problems.

The bulk of classtime will be spent in discussion, which requires the student's attendance and active participation. In addition, a project or presentation will be required of all students. Any student who has no background in China studies will be required to read John K. Fairbanks' The United States and China, and Edgar Snow's Red Star over China by the third week of the term."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


HISTORY:
Histoire de la Civilisation Francaise
Chuck Faulkner, Fall 1973

 
"This course will trace the development of French civilisation from the Revolution (1789) to the end of the 19th century. During this period France survived four revolutionary crises and experimented with a variety of political regimes: monarchies, empires, republics. It was, nevertheless, a period extremely rich in all areas of human endeavour; French painters and sculptors, novelists and poets, scientists and philosophers dominated the European scene. In this course, we will attempt to integrae the various events, forces and movements in order to provide a coherent picture of a dynamic period in French history.

Readings, films, lectures and class discussion will be in French."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


HISTORY:
Studies in European History
Milt Powell, Winter 1974 (and many other terms)

 
"This course is essentially group supervised independent study. We will spend about two weeks at the beginning of the term in general discussion of European history as an object of study. Then each student will select a topic for study during the remainder of the term and will meet at least once a week in small groups with other students for progress reports and information sharing."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


HISTORY:
History through Biography and Autobiography
Milt Powell, Winter 1974

 
"For obvious reasons biography and autobiography provide the most direct contact with the past. In this course we will consider them as literature as well as history. During the first part of the term we will read and discuss two examples (Erickson and Kazin) touching upon such matters as the uses and abuses of biography, the contributions of psycho-history, and the relationships of individuals to their own times. Each student will be expected to complete an independent project which may consist of further reading of biographies and autobiographies, or actually writing a short biography."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


HISTORY:
Major Issues in the American Past
Milt Powell, Spring 1974

 
"This course is based on two assumptions: that we can learn about ourselves through study of our society's past; and that study of the past should begin with today's questions. We will spend the first part of the course identifying those problems, questions, issues and controversies that we believe are most important in our society today. Then we will organize the remainder of the term around the historical study of those topics. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


HISTORY:
The History of ______________ (Fill in the blank)
Milt Powell, Spring 1974

 
"A discipline can be auxiliary to any other. You can study the sociology of medicine, the economics of engineering, the psychology of religion, they religion of psychology and, of course, the history of anything. The major premise of this course is that the application of historical study will enhance and enrich your understanding of whatever you choose to examine. We will begin the course with a general discussion of history as a mode of knowing. ... Then each student will be expected to pursue, individually, the historical study of some area of knowledge of his or her choosing. It can be from your field of concentration, or vocation, a hobby, game, or avocation. Anything worth knowing can be studied historically. And doing so will teach you much about history itself. There will be a short paper due early in the term and a report on your individual project due at the end of the term."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INDEPENDENT STUDY: JMC 400A (Overview)

 
"Independent Study involves the development of a plan to study with a JMC faculty member, or another faculty member approved by the College. Unless a student signs up for a twelve credit project during one term, 400A credits are not used to satisfy the field study requirements of the College. Miscellaneous 400A credits may however be used toward the college electives requirement. Students interested in doing independent study should first discuss their interest with a full-time member of the college faculty whose written approval must be obtained before enrolling. By his approval, the faculty member is making a commitment to supervise your independent study project."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION:  100: Expository Writing I

 
"Designed primarily to provide the skills necessary for writing term papers, reports, and essay examinations. Subject matter is some significant social or personal issue or problem. Ideas are discussed in small groups with a background of information provided by films, lectures, and readings.

Each term I & E concentrates on a specific theme; Fall Term it will be "The Problem of Values". Students will attend eight or nine films, both features and shorts, that reflect current viewpoints on values -- films such as Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal, Fellini's Juliet of the Spirits, Luis Bunuel's Viridiana, Saul Bass's Why Man Creates. They will also read contemporary works by writers such as Joseph Heller, John Updike, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Ralph Ellison, Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, and Tom Wolfe.

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973

"One thing I didn't realize I learned until later was how much I had learned about communicating, I took a number of JMC literature and writing classes and always felt a bit like I was in over my head. When I started working, I realized I really was a pretty good writer...! Now I frequently end up in the role of chief organizer and PowerPoint author on my project teams."

- Cleo Parker, June 2003

" I also think Inquiry and Expression ... was one of the most beneficial courses I ever took. It prepared me to write my way into, around and through anything in life and work, and do it with a little bit of soul." - Phil Nash
 


INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION:  101: Expository Writing II

 
"A continuation of JMC 100 (expository writing), but focuses on a different thematic problem, deals with more sophisticated elements of style and, at the discretion of the Instructor, allows more freedom of form. Uses feature films, readings, and small group discussions."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION:  102: Individual Writing Projects

 
"Writing assignments adapted to the individual student: personal essays, verse, fiction, or special types of exposition. Uses feature films, readings, and small discussion groups."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION:  103:
Experiments in Expression (Overview)

 
"Doing. Making. Seeing. Through lab experiences in video-tape students will explore their visual competency by scripting, producing, and evaluating visual products. The course does not require prior training in the arts -- poetry, dance, film, photography -- but it does presume an amateur's interest in various forms of expression. In this training of the eye and ear, students will attend the I & E films and read Marshall McLuhan's Understanding Media."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION:  103:
Experiments in Expression: Introductory Poetry Workshop
Carolyn Forché, Spring 1974

 
"An introduction to the elements of form and poetic technique. Workshop format is an informal discussion approach designed to develop each poet's own voice and critical sense. The emphasis is upon original student work and experimentation with the ideas of various contemporary movements. We will study the approaches of other poets, including Roethke, Ginsberg, Snyder, Creeley, Patchen, Sexton, Ferlinghetti and Merwin. Several young, publishing poets will visit the workshop to share their ideas and offer criticism. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION:  Themes: 1965 - 1969

 
I can verify some themes, too: Problem of Values, Man and Warfare, The Quest, Coming of Age, Reality and Illusion...

I have a handout from my Winter 73 I&E class which lists the theme as "Illusion and Reality" -- I'm sure Fellini and Bergman fit in here, and some instructors may have used Castaneda. ...

[As problems were noted with the inaugural I & E lectures...] [T]he I&E staff as I knew it began to coalesce and to lobby for more interesting stuff -- for one thing, we noted the response to the film or two we had was much greater than that to most of the lectures. Presto: the I&E film series and the first theme: The Problem of Values.

- Keven Bridge, 2002


There was a documentary shown in fall 1968 (theme was "Values", I think) called "16 in Webster Groves." If my memory is correct,... [that quarter]... was the last one for I&E that included a mix of movies and lectures. Starting with the winter quarter 1969 (Man and Warfare) ... [Films: Paths of Glory, The War Game, Hiroshima, Mon Amour]... and from then on, it was pretty much just movies.

- Bill Trevarthen


Themes then I think included "The Quest" and "Reality vs. Illusion" or similar phrasing, thus explaining "Blow Up".

- Gary Steele


INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION:  MOVIES

 
For a listing of the films presented in Inquiry and Expression, go to this website's I & E Movies Page.

INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: JMC 389A (Overview)

 
"Special interdisciplinary studies relating material from several disciplines and/or areas. Courses offered under this number will be for either 3 or 4 credits. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 8 credits if a different topic is taken. Credits are applicable to college electives requirements."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973 / Winter 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389A:
The Many Faces of Spain
Rosa Maria Marti, Fall 1972

 
"This course will emphasize the variety of cultural patterns found among its regions and people. For example: the different languages spoken, traditions, legends, folklore, cuisine, separatist tendencies, regional characteristics of the people, the imporant minorities and their struggle to keep their identity.

If there is enough student interest, this course will be offered in two sections, one in English and one in Spanish. Should two groups develop, additional meeting time will be arranged with the students."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: (? - Exact series / title unknown)
Science Fiction (Precise Title Unknown)
Leonard Isaacs & Glenn Wright, Winter 1972 (?)

 
Not many people realize the premier science fiction writers' gathering - the Clarion Writers Workshop - came to MSU as the result of the efforts of JMC's Leonard Isaacs and Glenn Wright. Evidence of their critical roles in this migration includes Clarion memorial scholarships in each of their names.

During the 1971-'72 academic year (I think it was in winter '72), 'Lenny and Glenny' held their inaugural course on Science Fiction. It was listed as Interdisciplinary Studies, and could be taken as a composite of 4 credits of Humanities + 4 credits of Natural Science.

The class was wildly popular (even for JMC), and we ended up with a maximum number of enrollees. The reading list spanned the history of SF from the turn of the century up until the (then-) present day. As with most JMC classes, discussion was the primary element. Lenny would review and expand upon the scientific themes in the readings, and Glenn would similarly dig into the literary aspects.

The class wasn't simply a 'read and discuss' workshop on selected SF classics. Wright and Isaacs also made a point to introduce and discuss then-breaking news relating to science and science fiction themes. For example, we reviewed the cautionary 'Club of Rome' study (Limits to Growth) and debated the prospects for an environmental calamity. Another example was discussion of the artifacts and elements NASA chose to include on the Voyager probe destined to become the first human-made object to exit our solar system.

As was typical in JMC, each of us students was allowed to use our imaginations on our major class projects or papers. For my own part, I participated in a team which recorded a multi-hour tape on the subject of SF themes in contemporary rock music (e.g., 1984-style authoritarianism, space travel, etc.). We'd introduce the theme, discuss it as a sort of informal panel, and intersperse songs reflecting it.

Lenny and Glenn went on to repeat the SF class, if for no other reason than to accommodate the many students who'd been unable to enroll the first time around. In addition, Wright and Isaac's growing involvement in the SF field led to hosting the Clarion workshop at MSU - first as a one-shot affair, and eventually as its new home.

- Randy Whitaker

NOTE: My hypothesized Winter 1972 timeframe citation is supported by a February 1972 article from the Michigan State News (located in the MSU Archives) which features Wright and Isaacs' creation of the SF class. On the other hand, the Fall 1972 version of this popular course (cf. listing below) cites the original SF class as having been offered in '1971'.
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389A:
An Introduction to Science Fiction
Leonard Isaacs and Glenn Wright, Fall 1972

 
"Having last year offered a course in Science Fiction as a response to the popularity of the form in self-selected reading by members of the University community, we found that SF indeed formed an intriguing avenue of communication between the two general disciplines of the sciences and the humanities.

Following the ideas and perceptions gained, this fall, Leonard Isaacs, a natural scientist, and Glenn Wright, a literature professor, will offer a six credit interdisciplinary modular class that is meant to provide a critical introduction to the SF field. The course is intended for students without an extensive background of reading in the area (those with an extensive background should consider JMC 389 A&B, section 3 offered as a module during the second half of the term -- also 6 credits).

In the present course we will be dealing in such questions as: What is science fiction? What is its role in modern American culture? Does SF have intrinsic value? What is its relation to science and to literature? Readings will begin with the early phase of the 20th century SF, range through the 'modern SF classics', and conclude with an examination of the divergent (and sometimes radical) new directions taken by science fiction in hte last few years."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389A:
Futures: Through the Science-Fiction Glass Dark and Clear
Leonard Isaacs and Glenn Wright, Fall 1972

 
"During the second half of the term we will explore some of the intriguing themes of contemporary speculative fiction -- how it represents current philosophical and ideological beliefs in politics, economics, religion, ecology. Concurrently, we will deal with such specifics as the robot as a representation of alienated man as machine; with recent SF treatments of love and sex and with technical innovations in writing that tend to be representations of the ideas of the authors and their points of view.

Some basic knowledge of SF and it history will be assumed on the part of the instructors. In essence, we hope to make use of the insights learned from the SF course taught in 1971 and the Writers' Workshop in Science Fiction and Fantasy to be held on campus summer 1972. Our aim will be to analyze current trends in SF and see what they are saying to us about our world present and future."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389A:
Freedom and Polity in Education
Paul Hurrell, Fall 1973

 
"Students are invited to reflect upon their own educational experience and ideas, exploring comparisons with a view to projecting desirable educational changes, or possibly plans for education as a life process. A look at changing roles of formal and non-formal education leads to questions about education as an organized undertaking. If freedom is basic to education, so also it seems is organization under some system of governance. However, in coping with a network of systems, one finds that organizing for education can easily subvert its own purpose, by snuffing out freedoms essential to education. Yet to reject an organized state in the interests of freedom can also undercut both education and freedom. At least there is the loss of capabilities and resources made possible by organized cooperation. The informative tensions between freedom and polity provide a good springboard for exploring creative possibilities. Students select issues for personal emphasis."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389A:
Creative Problem Solving
Gordon Rohman and Mary Jim Josephs, Fall 1973

 
"To live is to have problems, and to solve problems is to grow intellectually. Perhaps at no other time in the history of the planet, have we been faced with such a bewildering variety of problems needing solving. But formal education has at best taken only a very cautious and tentative approach to problem-solving as a legitimate subject for schooling. Yet creative education, problem-solving education, has taken giant strides in the past in its ability to provide meaningful and productive ways to deal with a whole range of common human problems. In this course, we will present the approach to creative problem solving developed at the Creative Education Foundation at Buffalo and taught to many thousands of students around the country over the last ten years. The course will deal with a philosophy of creative behavior, various ways of facilitating the creative process, problem identifying, evaluating ideas, 'brainstorming', and many other techniques for facilitating creative problem solving. Students will be expected to purchase two books, the Creative Behavior Guidebook by Sidney J. Parnes and the Creative Behavior Workbook by the same author."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389A:
Value Options of the Autonomous Learner
Paul Hurrell, Winter 1974

 
"Study options in the course lend themselves to different degrees of autonomy in learning. For persons highly aware of their own interests in educational problems and possibilities, the course is open to highly independent lines of study. Those working through the class sessions will develop ways of characterizing the learner, and the autonomous learner in relation to a core of background material.

The circumstance that some views make individual independence and social involvement incompatible with each other will be explored. In the context of lifelong education, what mix of independence and involvement is conducive to educative experience? At what point in life might one hope to become an autonomous learner? By what means? As value questions are identified, a number of considerations suggest that the autonomous learner can be identified with key value commitments, and that the range of his value judgments is not indefinitely open.

Textbook: Carlton H. Bowyer, Philosophical Perspectives for Education"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: 389A
The Waking of Myth
Glenn Wright and Joel Aronoff, Winter 1974

 
"This course, the first of a two term sequence, will attempt to examine the origins and structures of mythic beliefs. We will be concerned in particular with the question of what makes a myth credible and how it organizes individual and social life. We will attempt to look at the many forms such mythic beliefs take, extending from the classic Greek and Roman statements to the expressions in contemporary film, drama, fiction and legend. Material from many disciplines will be used to help examine the demands and manifestations of myths.

As the course is planned as a unified presentation over two terms, students enrolling Winter term should expect to continue through Spring term. Enrollment is limited to sophomores and above. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: JMC 389A
Freshman Program
Harold Johnson (Coordinator), Spring 1974

 
"The Spring Term segment of the Freshman Program will focus on the student's involvement in the academic process both within the college and the university, identifying the various points of entry, commitment and responsibility relative to academic planning. Students will acquire an understanding of the academic governance system, curriculum structure, and career planning. Students will examine variations in learning styles, the concept and use of learning contracts, outline a tentative area of concentration, inventory various college and university learning resources, and become alert to alternative modes for involvement in their own learning process. Classes will involve extensive use of simulation of learning styles and formats, as well as some focus on the process of decision-making. The course is open to all freshmen, including those who did not take the Fall or Winter term segments of the Freshman Program."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: JMC 389A
Perspectives on Life and Learning; Personal Values and Social Change
Paul Hurrell and Neil Cullen, Spring 1974

 
"On the basis of their own educational experience, students introduce initial points of view on values, for purposes of inquiry. These provisional points of view are re-examined in the context of perspectives from the textbooks:

  • A. N. Whitehead, The Aims of Education
  • Berris and Slater, The Temporary Society
  • Downie and Telfer, Respect for Persons
  • A. H. Maslow, The Farther Reaches of Human Nature

Taking account of issues which come to the fore, each student develops a critical, organized paper setting forth either a defense of his original point of view or a rationale for a new one. Regular class participation is essential to the plan of the course." "

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: JMC 389A
Decision Making
Mary Jim Josephs and Fred Graham, Spring 1974

 
"...The purpose of this decision-making course is to help you learn decision-making skills and to provide practice in applying these skills to a variety of situations that may be very similar to actual circumstances under which you will have to make decisions throughout life.

...The instructors will expect real engagement from the students with the materials of the course. This will be a skills course and not a course in theories of decision-making. ..." "

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: JMC 389A
Art and Apperception
Betty Dickinson and Milt Powell, Spring 1974

 
"Painting consists of both perception and representation. The artist must see before he can paint. And his seeing is strongly influenced by his culture and his place within that culture. To become conscious of such influences in past and present cultures and conscious of the act of seeing is what this course is about. Learning activities will include films, slides, discussions, assigned readings, a sketch journal, class presentations and individual projects.

Text: Joshua Taylor, Learning to See"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: JMC 389A
Advanced Poetry Workshop
Carolyn Forché, Spring 1974

 
"A workshop approach to the process of revision. Through informal discussion of the work of participating poets, there will be an attempt to refine our critical sensibilities and come to grips with the problem of honing a distinct poetic voice and aesthetic direction. It will be assumed that participants will have some familiarity with literary traditions and contemporary movements. We'll do some work with translation, exploring different techniques - at present I am most interested in native American poetry. Visiting poets from different areas will join us occasionally to share their approaches to the problems of working with language and finding publishers."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS: JMC 389B (Overview)

 
"Independent special interdisciplinary studies relating material from several disciplines and/or areas. Courses offered under this number will be for either 3 or 4 credits. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 8 credits if a different topic is taken. Credits are applicable to college electives requirements."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389B: (? - Series Unknown)
The Spanish Civil War (? - Precise Title Unknown)
Juan Antonio Calvo, 1967 or 1968

 
"... one course I wanted to take but couldn't fit in my schedule ..."

- SOURCE: Julie Leininger (Pycior), October 2003
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389B:
Spanish Speaking Americans: The Puerto Ricans
Diana Scholberg, Fall 1972

 
"This course is offered, in English, as an optional part of the Spanish module which runs through fall term. However, it is also available to others who are interested in learning about the background and culture of this important group of Americans. Class meeting time (approximately 1-2 hours per week) will be worked out once the module is organized. The basic texts for this course are: Babin -- The Puerto Ricans' Spirit and Fitzpatrick -- Puerto Rican Americans."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389B:
Spanish Speaking Americans: The Chicanos
Tom Tamandl, Fall 1972

 
"This course is offered, in English, as an optional part of the Spanish module which runs through fall term, but is available to anyone with an interest in Chicano history and culture. Some background materials will be necessary for a complete understanding of how and why Chicanos have arrived at their present place in the United States, but the emphasis will be on the most recent developments in the Chicano movement. Class meeting time will be worked out between students and professor at the beginning of fall term.

Note: Students taking the course here listed on Chicanos may also be interested in Chicano Community Projects which are available through the Field Education Program. This is an option available to students enrolled ...[in this course]...

As described under 'Field Education Courses' (cf. Field Education entry elsewhere on this webpage):

In conjunction with the Special Topics ID JMC 389B course on Chicanos ... there are a limited number of opportunities for students enrolled under ... [that course] ... to enroll for additional credits by working on certain projects in the Chicano community in Lansing. Transportation is necessary, through arrangements might be worked out for rides. ... Enrollment by Permission Only"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS 389B:
The Teaching Apprentice Seminar
Gordon Rohman and Mary Jim Josephs, Fall 1973
Mary Jim Josephs, Winter 1974 / Spring 1974

 
"Similar in some ways to the recently-inaugurated teaching / learning seminar taught last Winter term, this seminar will be run to provide student teaching apprentices with a chance to learn about teaching strategies which they will be suing in various JMC courses. ... All apprentices working in the ... term in various JMC courses will assemble once a week in this seminar to discuss teaching / learning theory and to share their epxeriences in JMC courses."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974 / Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSE: JMC 400V
Contemporary Brazil
Thomas Saunders, Fall 1973

 
"(Jointly offered with the Departments of Economics, Romance Languages and James Madison College)

This course is interdisciplinary and will be taught by Dr. Thomas Saunders, American University Field Staff Representative, an expect in Latin American culture. This course is jointly listed in the departments mentioned above. Class cards will be available at the Romance Languages table in the class card arena at Registration. The classroom will be posted on the bulletin board outside the JMC Advising Center. JMC students can use the credit toward their JMC Social Science requirement (see Dr. Johnson) or their Humanities (see Dr. Powell) or their college electives requirement."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: (Precise Series / Title Unknown)
'THE ENVIRONMENT PROJECT'
Thomas Jaeger (U. of Illinois - Chicago), Spring 1970

 
There was a lot to distract a student's attention during the chaotic Spring 1970 quarter (e.g., protests, Peoples Park). Nonetheless, it was during this quarter that one of the most interesting JMC courses was held. The theme of the class was 'the environment', and it was led by architect Thomas Jaeger (who flew in each week for the one huge class meeting). It was listed as Interdisciplinary Studies, and could be taken as a composite of 4 credits of Humanities + 4 credits of Social Science.

The general theme for the class was the examination and analysis of 'our environment' - in this case, our own College (JMC).

The class was project-oriented in the extreme. Jaeger quickly organized the roughly 60 students into four teams delineated in accordance with the four primary issues / questions generated as basic elements of our 'environment':

  1. "Who are the members of this community, and what are their needs?"
  2. "What are the specifications and quality of the present physical and non-physical facilities of Snyder-Phillips Hall?"
  3. "What organizational structures and programs operate in the Snyder-Phillips community?"
  4. "What, then, is the rationale for a residential college?"

Each team had a designated team leader and a communicator (whose job it was to serve as liaison with the other 3 groups). I was communicator for the Educational Rationale team, for which Andy Lininger was the team leader.

Each week, Jaeger would both require us to report on what had been accomplished since his last visit and then set the daunting agenda for the next step. He made it clear from the beginning that there was work to be done, and by George we would do it as specified.

We set out to explore and examine all aspects of our JMC environs - ranging from the physical parameters of our living and common spaces to the College's administrative infrastructure to the JMC concept itself. The culminating product was The Environment Report - a 173 - page document (plus Appendices) which described the College, identified its key problems, and set out prescriptions for improvements.

Taken in isolation, this alone would have made the course extraordinary. However, the turmoil on campus opened up an opportunity for the course to effect a relevance unlike any other class I remember. A Provost's Committee had been established to discuss (or as some would claim - stonewall) JMC students' push to reform Sny-Phi operations and make the dorm complex truly coeducational. Our student representatives went a long way toward demonstrating their seriousness and their points when they plopped preemptive copies of The Environment Report on the table. In the end, we got most of what we sought, and I still believe the 'environment class' was a contributing factor in this successful campaign.

In other words, Jaeger's class fostered learning not only about our 'environment' per se, but also about teamwork, critical analysis, and grassroots innovation. What an outcome!

- Randy Whitaker
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTS & HUMANITIES: JMC 239A (Overview)

 
"Special interdisciplinary studies related to the arts and humanities. Courses offered under this number will be either 3 or 4 credits. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 8 credits if different topic is taken. Credits applicable to core requirement in humanities."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTS & HUMANITIES:
Civilization
Milt Powell, Fall 1972

 
"The subject of the course will be the art, architecture, music, and literature of Western Civilization from the fall of Rome to the present. The focal point of the course will be the thirteen films made by Sir Kenneth Clark for the BBC. To supplement them: class discussions, film strips, individual and group projects.

Texts:

Texts: Kenneth Clark, Civilization (now available in paperback) ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTS & HUMANITIES:
Revolutions of Culture
Milt Powell, Fall 1973

 
"There are periods in human history which have seen rapid transformation of cultural values and norms, periods in which the very perception of human nature has changed. These periods, which I call revolutions of culture, are heralded by great books and works of art rather than political regimes. Yet by altering the scope and quality of our experience they have had great influence over our lives. In addition to the study of previous revolutions of culture like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment we will examine the possibility that a comparable movement is taking place now. Students will be asked to do futuristic extrapolation as well as historical speculation.

Texts:

  • Jan Huizinga, The Waning of the Middle Years
  • Thomas Kuhn, The Copernican Revolution
  • Peter Gay, The Enlightenment, An Interpretation"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTS & HUMANITIES:
Creative Analysis
Gordon Rohman and Mary Jim Josephs, Winter 1974

 
"Creative analysis is a course in how to use words to solve problems. It is built around the workbook Creative Analysis by Albert Upton and Richard W. Samson. The course is the second in a sequence of three courses to be offered in JMC this year on the general theme of creative problem solving. In Fall Mary Jim Josephs and Gordon Rohman gave a course in group creative problem solving and in the Spring they will give a course in decision-making. Each of the three courses is planned as a separate unit and can be taken without taking the other two. The Winter course, Creative Analysis, emphasizes words as tools of thought. The workbook contains graded exercises, preceded by explanatory text, which teach students such problem-solving properties of language as qualification, signs and symbols, analysis, and analogy.

The major objective of the course is to increase a student's capacity to solve problems with words. To evaluate his progress, the instructors will use two major means: the performance on the workbook exercises in class, and the level of productivity and imagination in a journal which all students will keep..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTS & HUMANITIES: JMC 239B (Overview)

 
"Independent interdisciplinary studies related to the arts and humanities. Courses offered under this number will be for variable credit, 1 - 4 exclusively. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 8 credits if different topic is taken. Credits applicable to core requirement in Humanities."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTS & HUMANITIES: JMC 239B
Philosophy for Related Studies
Paul Hurrell, Fall 1973

 
"Studies in a wide range of disciplines tend to encounter, at certain points, philosophical assumptions and questions. Where these are sufficiently identified to be of interest, students may arrange studies for self-orientation to relevant background in philosophy. Although philosophy can be regarded as a uniquely interdisciplinary study, these studies should aim at relating views and concepts from philosophy to some other specific area in which the student has been working."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTS & HUMANITIES: JMC 239B
Integrative Studies in Philosophy
Paul Hurrell, Winter 1974

 
"As philosophical issues are encountered in diverse subject matters, studies aimed at developing relevant background and acquiring perspective can have a timely importance. To begin a process of self-orientation directly related to immediate concerns, students who enroll in this section develop plans for individaul or group study, drawing upon the interdisciplinary nature of philosophical concerns."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:  SOCIAL SCIENCE: JMC 259A (Overview)

 
"Special interdisciplinary studies related to the social sciences. Courses offered under this number will be for either 3 or 4 credits. Students may re-enroll under this number for a maximum of 8 credits if a different topic is taken. Credits are applicable to core requirement in social science."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:  SOCIAL SCIENCE: JMC 259B (Overview)

 
"Independent interdisciplinary studies related to the social sciences. Independent study enrolled for under this number can be for variable credit, 1 - 4 exclusively. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 8 credits if a different topic is taken. Credits are applicable to core requirement in social science."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973 / Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: SOCIAL SCIENCE: JMC 259A
The Nature of Tragedy and the Modern Political Process
Harold Johnson, Fall 1972

 
"This course will be taught in conjunction with separate offerings by Dr. Hurrell in Philosophy and Dr. Wright in Literature; all will deal with the nature of tragedy from the vantage of their respective fields. It will be my aim as a social scientist in general and a political scientist by training to look at modern man and see what in his behavior is a clue leading to tragic action. Thus we will examine events, aspirations, trends manifest in political theory and action that have led historians and political philosophers to label them as tragic. The United States involvement in Viet Nam is an all too perfect point of reference.

Students taking this course are also eligible to take JMC 499 section I meeting on Wednesday evenings. This will be a course designed to synthesize the three tragedy courses previously mentioned. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:  SOCIAL SCIENCE:
Survival in a Statistical Society or Beating the Numbers Game
Neil Cullen and James Goatley, Winter 1974

 
"A course for people who hate / fear numbers and wish they'd all go away. In order to stay sane in our society a citizen must know how to decipher everything from charge account interest rates to newspaper reports on the effectiveness of the pill and a daily barrage of charts, graphs, and polls. In this course we'll explain words such as 'mean', 'mode', 'median', 'correlation' -- and why they are important. We'll explore the reading of charts, graphs and diagrams. We'll talk about how you can lie with impressive looking numbers -- and how you can tell when you're being lied to. This is not a course in doing numbers, it's a course in understanding them. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:  SOCIAL SCIENCE:
The Role of the Helping Professions in Community Services
Pearl Aldrich and John Duley, Spring 1974

 
"The purpose of this course is to provide a learning experience as basic preparation for those students who will be doing a community agency field placement, for those doing volunteer work and for those interested in exploring a career in the helping professions. The course will cover two major social issue areas: the special needs of children and the needs of the aging. The first five weeks will include the presentation of the needs of children, the Ingham County resources available to meet these needs, case studies to be developed and analyzed by students individually and in the recitation session and an experiential component in which students will visit agencies to gain the perspective of clients. The second five weeks will deal with the needs of the aging, the available community resources and the development and analyses of case histories. The experiential component will consist of an information survey conducted by members of the class in Lansing. Film and video taped presentations will be developed and used experimentally in the class."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:  SOCIAL SCIENCE:
Freshman Seminar
Phil Johnson (Coordinator), Spring 1974

 
"The freshman seminar will be structured around the issue of Human Freedom and Autonomy. We will examine several concepts of freedom, and will evaluate proposed means to their attainment.

Distinguished faculty from the fields of Philosophy, Physical Science, Psychology, Sociology, History and Education wil examine the issue from the perspective of their own and related disciplines. They will present points of view that are representative. It should be kept in mind, however, that the viewpoints expressed will by no means exhaust the field. They will merely scratch the surface of rich and vital dialogue within those fields that pertain to freedom and autonomy. ...

The course, then, is designed to expose students to the dialogue and to do so by drawing from substantive areas of Philosophy, Sociology, Intellectual History and the like. We intend, as an immediate consequence of the course, to initiate inquiry into some larger questions of freedom and autonomy in which University education may presumably play a significant role.

The course will meet Spring term on Monday and Wednesday afternoons. One session each week will be given over to the presentation of a thesis by distinguished faculty, interested students, or invited guests. The other session will be devoted to small group discussion."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


LANGUAGES:  (Overview)

 
"Justin Morrill College language programs are designed for students who wish to acquire foreign language proficiency more rapidly than is possible in traditional university courses. Within one year (less in the upper tracks) JMC students find that they are able to communicate in the foreign tongue in all four skills: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Language learning in JMC takes place in small groups and in an atmosphere which encourages active student participation. Furthmore, classroom discussion, compositions and readings not only offer the student the opportunity to exercise his language skills, but provide valuable insights into the cultures and civilizations of which the language is a part. At present, the intensive programs are available in French, Spanish and Russian. A student may start one of the three languages, without any previous training, and complete a 'two year proficiency' in the three term Track I sequence. In addition, Spanish and French students may enter a more advanced program according to their preparation. Placement into a JMC language track is done by interpretation of the results of the language placement test, usually taken during summer orientation. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


LANGUAGES:  FRENCH:  TRACK I: JMC 104A/104B

 
"...The course is designed so that students immediately begin using the language in controlled conversations. Soon they begin discussing various aspects of French culture based on readings and lectures and on material presented on tapes, films and records. The emphasis in the course is on understanding, speaking and then writing French. Upon completion of the course, students will not only understand French but will be able to respond quickly and accurately in various situations."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972

"French Track I is an intensive course leading to a four skill competency (understanding, speaking, reading, writing) equivalent to a two year proficiency in the French language.

104A and 104B must be taken concurrently.

104A ... Through situational dialogues and a variety of oral and written exercises, students learn to speak and write with grammatical accuracy.

104B ... Under the guidance of a native French speaker, students speak, read and test their understanding of the language. The conversation classes are based on the study of French culture."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


LANGUAGES:  FRENCH:  TRACK I: JMC 246A/246B

 
"...[A] three term intensive language course designed for students having little or no previous French language experience. Upon completion of the course, students will have acquired at least a 2 year proficiency in the language and will be prepared for full participation in advanced French language and/or literature courses..."

"Under the guidance of a native French speaker, the student learns to reproduce French sounds and rhythm patterns and ultimately to think in French.

The class style is informal. Classroom participation is emphasized, attendance also. Current events and personal experiences are discussed in French.

Modes of expression: oral reports, conversation, small and large group discussions, debates, reading, writing and acting of plays, etc...."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


LANGUAGES:  FRENCH:  TRACK III: JMC 224A/224B
(Overview)

 
"Track III is an intermediate level French course aimed at the student's attainment of ease, fluency and self-confidence in communicating in French and at the level of development of an understanding and appreciation of French literature and culture. The course will prepare the student for more advanced courses in language and literature in the Romance Languages Department or for travel or study abroad. The A section will focus on reading and writing skills in classes conducted in French."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973

NOTE: The course designations for JMC French Track III were as follows:

  • 224A - General instructional course(s)
  • 224B - French Conversational / Oral Practice

These two classes (4 and 2 credits, respectively) were to be taken concurrently.


LANGUAGES:  FRENCH:
TRACK 3: JMC 224A/224B
TRACK 4: JMC 274A/274B

 
"Students will be placed into track 3 or track 4 by examination with groupings arranged later according to the competencies of individual students. The instructors will arrange groups for specific tasks, such as conversation, oral reports, composition, discussions of readings, skits, etc. These groupings will be flexible and open and could be changed during the term. Emphasis on the course will be on helping students progress as repidly and as well as they are able through the intermediate levels of French in order that they attain ease, fluency and self-confidence in communicating in French, while at the same time they begin to develop an understanding and appreciation of contemporary French culture."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972

NOTES: Beginning Fall 1973, there is no mention of a French track 4.

According to the Fall 1972 Course Descriptions the track 3 class description covers track 4 as well.

The course designations for JMC French Track IV were as follows:

  • 274A - General instructional course(s)
  • 274B - French Conversational / Oral Practice

These two classes (3 and 2 credits, respectively) were to be taken concurrently.


LANGUAGES:  FRENCH:  TRACK III: JMC 336A/336B
(Overview)

 
"Track III is an intermediate level French course aimed at the student's attainment of ease, fluency and self-confidence in communicating in French and at the level of development of an understanding and appreciation of French literature and culture. The course will prepare the student for more advanced courses in language and literature in the Romance Languages Department or for travel or study abroad."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: The course designations for JMC French Track III were as follows:

  • 336A - General instructional course(s)
  • 336B - French Conversational / Oral Practice


LANGUAGES:  FRENCH:  TRACK III:
Melange Litteraise
Charles Faulkner, Spring 1974

 
"The goal of this course is to introduce students to a variety of French literary genres: poems, short stories, plays and a novel. Through readings, analysis, class discussions as well as short compositions, students will find ample opportunity to improve their communications skills in French. ... The course is also offered as JMC Literature, 231A ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


LANGUAGES:  RUSSIAN: JMC 105A/105B

 
"The Russian Program in Justin Morrill College is a one-track, highly intensive course of instruction leading to a four skill (understanding, speaking, reading, writing) competency equivalent to two years of rigorous college Russian. In the initial stages of the program emphasis will be placed on listening comprehension. This method, while delaying oral response until the student feels ready to respond, is expected to result ultimately in the achievmement of markedly higher levels of competency in all four language skills than those normally achieved by students at comparable stages in their language programs. The basic grammar text will be supplemented by numerous exercises for comprehension, including but not limited to rate controlled films and recordings as well as contemporary newspapers and journals. Students who have experienced particular success in the study of foreign languages in high school are especially encouraged to consider this challenging program. Upon successful completion of this program, students are equipped to enter third-year level Russian courses within the university. Many students from the JMC Russian Program have also participated in the summer Russian Language Program at Leningrad University. Superior language students are encouraged to take advantage of this program."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973

"...[T]he intensive language class was such a great experience that I went on to major in Russian Area Studies, get a Masters in Russian at MSU and a Ph. D. in Russian literature at Brown University."

- Susan Schilling (Keats), October 2003

NOTE: The two sections - 105A and 105B (5 and 3 credits, respectively) had to be taken concurrently. (- Ed.)
 


LANGUAGES:  RUSSIAN: JMC 166A/166B

 
"The Russian Program in Justin Morrill College is a one-track, highly intensive course of instruction leading to a four skill (understanding, speaking, reading, writing) competency equivalent to two years of rigorous college Russian. It is taught by a team of three experienced Russian instructors who rotate between sections providing a different instructor each successive class hour. Along with the basic grammar text, a wide variety of contemporary and literary materials (films, recordings, newspapers, etc.) provide diverse means for learning and practicing the Russian language. ... Students who successfully complete the JMC intensive Russian Program are equipped to enter third-year level ... courses in the MSU Department of German and Russian. Several dozen students from the JMC Russian Program have continued their study of Russian in the summer Russian Language Program at Leningrad University which involved eight weeks of study and travel in the USSR. Superior students of JMC's intensive program are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity following their sophomore year."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: The two sections - 166A and 166B (5 and 3 credits, respectively) had to be taken concurrently. -Ed.
 


LANGUAGES:  SPANISH:  TRACK I: JMC 106A/106B

 
"This course involves intensive study for those with little or no previous training. The student develops the ability to understand, speak, read and write Spanish, and becomes knowledgeable about many aspects of Hispanic culture.

This is a one year sequence, but the proficiency level at the end of that time is equal to two years of study in traditional programs. In fall term, all the course work concerns the acquisition of basic skills. Generally speaking, the A section presents and drills on the structure of the language; the B sections provide oral and conversational practice. The language lab sessions are an integral part of this course; they emphasize pattern practice, correct pronunciation, and aural comprehension.

All students must enroll in both the A and the B section. After the first meeting, the class will be subdivided into smaller groups, for more effective language learning."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 (pretty much identical to Fall 1972 listing)
 


LANGUAGES:  SPANISH:  TRACK I: JMC 167A/167B

 
"This course continues the intensive study of basic skills in order to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write Spanish. (Students planning to enter this sequence for the first time in Winter term should have some previous background in Spanish. ...) Although the basic dialogues, drills, and language lab session are still important, students have increasing opportunity to express their own thoughts in Spanish. The texts stress contemporary culture of both Spain and Latin America.

Students must enroll in both the A and the B section. [5 and 3 credits, respectively - Ed.] After the first meeting, the class will be subdivided into smaller groups for more effective language learning."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


LANGUAGES:  SPANISH:  TRACK III: JMC 236A/236B

 
"This intensive course is for students who have had approximately two or three years of High School Spanish, or about one year of college level work. ... Track III is designed to improve and strengthen skills in understanding, speaking, reading and writing, and to provide insights into Hispanic thought and culture. There are three major emphases: 1) a review of structure of the language; 2) oral practice with intensive work on vocabulary and idiom building; and 3) reading and discussion of articles, short stories and plays by contemporary Hispanic writers. As subject matter for conversation we use topics of current interest: the population explosion in Latin America, Castro's Cuba, the role of women in the U.S. and in Hispanic societies, etc.

All students must enroll in both the A and B sections. [4 and 2 credits, respectively - Ed.] If enrollment warrants it, the class will be subdivided into smaller groups, taking into account variations in background and preparation."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 "...In all aspects of the course, the aim is for the student to be able to express his own ideas of subjects of interest to mature young people. To provide a focus for the discussion of literary works, our reading deals with the general theme of Man and His Conscience. Each play or short novel examines in some way the moral and ethical values of man in society. The problems are universal in nature, but we will want also to consider to what extent the Hispanic roots of each author influence his perception and presentation of the problem of conscience."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


LANGUAGES:  SPANISH:  TRACK III: JMC 297A/297B

 
"This intensive course is for students who have had considerable experience in Spanish. The course continues to improve skills in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish, and to strengthen the student's comprehension of Hispanic culture. There are three major emphases: 1) a review of structure of the language; 2) oral practice with intensive work on vocabulary and idiom building; and 3) reading and discussion of works in various genres by contemporary Hispanic writers."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


LITERATURE: JMC 231A (Overview)

 
"Study of the discipline of Literature with selected topics, periods and genres. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Spring 1974
 


LITERATURE:
The American University Novel
Maurice Crane, early 1966

 
"I also took a course called the American University Novel in JMC, taught by Maurice Crane. (see http://www.lib.msu.edu/vincent/crane_bio.html) If I can unearth my diploma where there may be a copy of my transcript, I can pinpoint when it was. I am guessing it was in the winter or spring of 66."

- Suzanne Sheldon Levy, April 2003
 


LITERATURE:
Shakespeare (Precise Title Unknown)
Don Gochberg, Fall 1968

 
"My wife and I met Fall term of 1968 in Don Gochberg's JMC Shakespeare class and performed in (for the one extra credit...remember how at the time JMC courses were often divided into 3 credits for the main class and one credit for something more creative?) an elaborately staged reading of "Everyman." Dr. Gochberg was a visiting prof from University College (ATL, Humanities, etc.) ... He was a marvelous teacher, very enthusiastic and with an appropriate flare for the dramatic. He also introduced his students to Eric Partridge's "Shakespeare's Bawdy," which made reading the Bard so much more fun."

- Bill Trevarthen, December 2002
 


LITERATURE:
Ulysses  (Precise Course Title Unknown)
Glenn Wright, Fall 1969

 
I'm a little surprised nobody has mentioned Glenn Wright's course with only one required text -- James Joyce's Ulysses.

When my father found out I had signed up for that course, he departed quite uncharacteristicly from his markedly Puritan attitude toward what he viewed as the racier side of life and confided that he and some school chums had passed around an illicitly printed copy of the book back when its importation and sale had been banned in the U.S. He was amused that I was going to get college credit for reading it.

One of the things I recall Glenn did in the course was to bring in maps of Dublin to explain -- if I recall correctly after all these years -- where Bloom and Daedalus wandered in the "Night Town" chapter. That helped a lot in making sense of a drunken ramble. (It seems to me that about the time of the class I also saw a film based on the book starring Milo O'Shea (who passed away not so long ago); it may have been part of the class, but that seems improbable.) The final was a gas -- I think we had to respond to three of five essay questions, or some such format. One of the questions quoted about twenty lines of poetry from the book and asked the student to explain the symbolism in it. I just let my imagination go and wrote whatever free associations the words evoked. Glenn saw through it and wrote in my blue book, "O.K., Charley, enough already!" or words to that effect. I got an A, mostly because I showed up at most if not all of the classes and actually did manage to read most of the book.

Not one of the "comp. lit./psych" crowd at JMC, my literary tastes in those days were along the line of Solzhenitsyn, Solzhenitsyn and more Solzhenitsyn. But Glenn's course got me intrigued with Joyce, and while in the Marines in San Diego I read Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Finnegan's Wake (of which I recall Glenn saying that in writing it Joyce had "descended into Mickey Mouse") and several of Joyce's letters and essays. [When you're enlisted in San Diego with little money and no car, you've got plenty of time on your hands to read. There were also ample opportunities to bring "Night Town" to life.] In recent years Patrick McGoohan and, I believe, two famous English or Irish actresses (names unrecalled at this moment) did a television play recounting a triangular correspondence the three maintained in their later years. I watched it with interest and thought of Glenn and Ulysses.

- Charley Roberts, December 2002
 


LITERATURE:
The Nature of Tragedy
Glenn Wright, Fall 1972

 
"One of the things that is intriguing about tragedy is that it dramatizes man in extremus -- at a point where the individual cannot or will not avoid a confrontation between the laws of the gods, the laws of society, and the individual's nature.

During the course of the module we will explore the roots and origins of dramatic tragedy and trace the development of the form from Greece through the English Renaissance, to 18th century France, and thence into the 20th century.

The course will be related to one offered by Dr. Hurrell in philosophy and one by Dr. Johnson in Political Science. All three will deal with the concepts of tragedy as they are reflected and related to their individual disciplines. In addition, JMC 499, section 1 will act as an integrating seminar ... Interested students may arrange to take any or all of the disciplinary courses -- Literature, Philosophy, Political Science. However only those students in the tragedy courses are eligible to enroll for the JMC 499 seminar. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


LITERATURE:
Hemingway and Faulkner
Mary Jim Josephs, Fall 1972

 
"This course will examine the two American writers who dominated the period between the two world wars. We will read novels and short stories of each. The style of the course will be discussion, in groups of varying sizes, with use of some student discussion leaders and with the use of process observers in relation to all activities of the class.

Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea and short stories.

Faulkner: The Sound and the Fury, The Bear and short stories."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


LITERATURE:
The Exploited Eden: Literature about the American Environment
Gordon Rohman, Fall 1972

 
"In recent years a new journalistic genre has emerged: the environmental horror story. Its origins can be traced to the growing public understanding of ecological problems and to a series of persuasive scientific studies that detail the facts of our changin biosphere. This course will attempt something quite different from a science-oriented approach to environment. It will survey some fo the literature about a double theme in American culture: America as Eden and Eden as it is exploited. We will read an anthology from which I take the title of the course, The Exploited Eden ..., as well as selected other readings. ...

Through interpretations in poetry, short stories, drama, science fiction, essays, and journalism, we will study a variety of approaches to the erupting problems of pollution, wasted resources, and the deterioration of the quality of our natural life. But just as important, the readings will provide two other things: a thematic and symbolic basis from which to view the history and literature of America, and an introduction to literature through a variety of materials focused upon a single theme.

I would hope for students with interests in literature and American culture as well as in the theme of this particular course. We will have lectures, discussion, group projects, special readings, and final papers. For those with a particular interest, there will be opportunity for original writing about the environment. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


LITERATURE:
American Resistance Literature
Freida Brown, Fall 1972

 
"Readings and discussion of major works of the contemporary American Resistance movement in its several and varied manifestations. Authors studied have been active participants in that movement and are representative of the voices of the blacks, Chicanos, draft and war resisters, feminists, Indians, political prisoners, and students. Through their works, we shall try to gain greater insights into their respective motives and methods, social attitudes and goals, and to understand more fully the historical moment in which they and we live."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


LITERATURE:
Film and Drama: A Comparison of Scripts
Glenn Wright, Fall 1973

 
"This course will be primarily concerned with an analysis of film scripts, both as literature in themselves and as vehicles for production.

We are long used to reading plays and comparing the text with various interpretative performances. By rough analogy, we will attempt to do some of the same type of analysis with film scripts and the film itself. At the same time we will explore what different demands and rewards are presented to the film viewer / reader from those of the play goer / reader."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


LITERATURE:
T. S. Eliot
Glenn Wright, Fall 1973

 
"T. S. Eliot is recognized as one of the major poetic figures of the twentieth century. His influence as a literary critic is also profound, and he was a highly successful dramatist. The term's work will center on a survey of Eliot's writings in these three areas. We will not attempt an in depth analysis of Eliot in either of the three mediums (ten weeks could easily be spent on 'The Four Quartets' or 'The Wasteland' alone); instead, the aim of the term will be to prove the genius of the man and see how his thought and art have mirrored and shaped some of the major concerns of our time."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


LITERATURE:
Psychology and Literary Criticism
Glenn Wright, Fall 1973

 
"The field of literary criticism has undergone revolutionary change in the 20th century. There are many reasons for these changes; one of the most important has been the development of the discipline of psychology. Freud in many of his theories scientifically explicated emotional truths that artists have always known and said through their art. Neo-Freudian theorists and others have expanded upon his principles and followed new paths and insights. The impact of these findings upon the arts in general and literature in particular has been profound, stimulating and controversial. The class will follow some of these insights, controversies and theories and see how they have had their impact upon the writing of fiction and literary criticism."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


LITERATURE:
A Teacher and Some Followers: Anderson, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Fitzgerald
Mary Jim Josephs, Fall 1973

 
"Sherwood Anderson helped and influenced many of his contemporaries. In this course we will begin with Anderson and go on to the works of three of the more famous writers who got their start in the 20's and who acknowledged some debt to Anderson. The class will be involvement oriented. Class participation will be essential. There will be large and small group discussions and other experiential activities. Process observers will be used to sensitize students to the importance of the dynamics of the group."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


LITERATURE:
French Drama (Conducted in French)
Charles and Eva Faulkner, Winter 1974

 
"In this course we will read and examine in depth selected French plays of both the classical and modern periods. The plays, two tragedies and two comedies, deal with certain universal aspects of human behavior: passion, idealism, hypocrisy and gullibility. Students will have the opportunity to select some scenes and informally perform them. There will be two take-home exams."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


LITERATURE:
Virginia Woolf
Glenn Wright, Winter 1974

 
"Yes, she was. And yes, I am somewhat afraid of her.

Virginia Woolf is an example of one of those "Mutations" that a literary history and tradition doesn't really prepare us for -- she is in the company of Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Brönte, and Charles Baudelaire. Their genius spawned new creatures that we didn't know existed until we saw them in our collective mirrors.

Like Joyce, her contemporary, Mrs. Woolf experimented with what we have come to call Stream of Consciousness (the phrase, curiously, is William James's). She is very different from Joyce -- easier and harder all at once -- more personal, more poetic, more a master builder of metaphysical terror; to me, more beautiful.

We will read some of Virginia Woolf's short stories, two of her novels (The Waves and To the Lighthouse) and one of the best treatises on what it means to be a woman and an artist that I can conceive of..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


LITERATURE:
To Be or Not to Be (To Exist or Not to Exist?)
Mary Jim Josephs and Paul Hurrell, Spring 1974

 
"Existential literature is very different from realistic fiction; plots are more diffuse, less organized, and characterization more central. This literature tends to be oriented to process rather than to events or adventures. To this degree these works are considered to be philosophical and understanding the philosophical assumptions and implications is helpful to understanding and appreciating the works. This course will focus on selected works of Dostoevsky, Sartre, Kafka, Camus and several other modern writers and, through the juxtaposition of works by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Jaspers and Heidegger will try to lead to an understanding of how this literature of the here and now might seem exciting and even positive. We will try to understand why Camus ends his account of the suffering and frustrations of Sisyphus by saying, 'One must imagine Sisyphus happy.'"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


LITERATURE:
Literature, Drama, and Film: A Comparison
Glenn Wright, 1975 (with Kathy Czar and Gary Steele)

 
"Marat-Sade The Movie" played in '75 or so for a course taught by Glenn Wright, Kathy Czar, and myself. Pity the unsuspecting IMC projectionist, who leaned over bewildered and whispered, "What kind of class is this, anyway??"

The course title was "Literature, Drama, and Film: A Comparison", or near that. Its intent was the exploration of each craft's core techniques, creative strengths and weaknesses, studies of works adapted for other media, and a look at some supposedly-unadaptable plays, novels, and films. Glenn covered lit, Kathy the drama, I had film.

Subjects included:

  • "Marat-Sade": Script, book, movie. A planned JMC Drama production fizzled, I think.
  • Huxley's "The Devils of Loudon", Russell's "The Devils" film, and an MSU Theatre Dept. production.
  • Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge".
  • "The Innocents" and/or "Turn of the Screw" (?) as good cross-media adaptations.
  • "Hearts of Darkness" and "Citizen Kane" as tough-to-transform specimens.

Beyond those, my memory's gone.

Highlight of term, paraphrased: Wright's pre-screening warning to Marat viewers prone to altered states that they not ingest, imbibe, or inhale before the film... "It's a bit disturbing, claustrophobic, may make you squirmy in your seat or feel bugs on the back of the neck, and otherwise just be a baaaaad time stoned...."

"The Devils" production at Fairchild took heat for nudity and hostile depiction of The Church. Meanwhile at JMC, we played the X-rated film edit, and I'm unaware of any stir it caused.

No $200 teaching fee by then, either -- Glenn tried, but lacked JMC budget for other planned film bookings, much less to pay 2 TA's. But, no reward needed as he'd leveraged for me a summer-term scholarship to a sold-out Ivy-League film studies program in Amherst (on Hampshire's campus) that led to a good time learning from some pro's...

- Gary Steele, May 2003
 


LITERATURE:
Freud Meets Darwin on a Golden Bough
Glenn Wright and Larry O'Kelly, Spring 1974

 
"We have done something like this course before, but this year we decided to change it. Both instructors are interested in the major currents of thought in the 19th century that have helped shape the ideas and realities of the 20th century. The particular focus of this term's work will be on Darwin, Freud, and Frazer. We will read some of the work of each of these men and juxtapose that reading with a novel each by Jane Austen (Pride and PrejudicePoint Counter Point) and Emile Zola (Nana).

We will be concerned with the themes of the origins of life, the nature of civilized man and the process of civilization, and with freedom.

In addition to the above texts, we will read: Freud's Psychopathology of Everyday Life and his Civilization and its Discontents; Darwin, edited by P. Appleman, and the one volume paperback edition of The Golden Bough. "

(Also offered as JMC 251A - Psychology)

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


LITERATURE:
The Waking of Myth, Part II
Glenn Wright and Joel Aronoff, Spring 1974

 
"This course will be the continuation of the offering of winter term in which we attempted to examine and explore the origins and structures of mythic beliefs. In particular, this term will look at the relationships between 'myth' and 'truth'. How do we know what we know; how do we know that what we know is true?

As before, we will use texts from a number of different disciplines - psychology, philosophy, literature, anthropology - as mediums for our exploration. Course also offered as JMC Psychology 251A ... and Psychology 400H ...."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE: (Precise Series / Title Unknown)
Genetics / Genetic Engineering
Leonard Isaacs, 1971 (?)

 
Leonard Isaacs created a JMC Nat Sci course on the subject of genetics in the very early 1970's. This turned out to be a wonderful seminar whose subject matter was a quarter-century ahead of its time.

As I recall, the core readings were Watson's Double Helix and Gunter Stent's The Coming of the Golden Age. The former illustrated how science had come to invest DNA with the central mysteries of life, and the latter illustrated the philosophical issues involved in a science which had matured to the point of identifying all the relevant mechanisms yet still was relatively clueless as to how these mechanisms yielded their phenomenal outcomes.

Lenny led us through a daunting array of issues ranging from the details of DNA to the social implications of genetics - up to and including the prospects for deliberate manipulation of the human genome (a subject whose popular currency wouldn't arrive until the late 1990's). He forced us to confront some uncomfortable topics, including race, eugenics, and the extent to which society could and even should intervene to prevent propagation of deleterious mutations.

In terms of its forward-looking vision, this course stands out as one of the most important I took at JMC. In terms of Isaacs' ability to keep the material interesting and to interrelate it with human and social ramifications, it was a sterling example of what a 'liberal education' course could be.

- Randy Whitaker
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  THE NATURE OF PHYSICAL THEORY: JMC 121A (Overview)

 
"Selected theories of physical science illustrative of man's attempts to understand his physical surroundings. The major revolutions in the nature of physical thought. The formulations, impact and modification of the mechanistic worldview."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: 'The Nature of Physical Theory' was designated JMC 121A. Individual topics were explored within particular sections under this rubric.


NATURAL SCIENCE:  THE NATURE OF PHYSICAL THEORY:
Science: A Biographical Look (Fall 1972 / Fall 1973)
Science: A Biographical Approach (Winter / Spring 1974)
James Goatley, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973 / Winter 1974 / Spring 1974

 
"Examination of the scientific enterprise by means of biographical and autobiographical material. Through a look at six men we will try to reveal something about the nature of science, its methods, its problems, its history, and the variety of people who engage in it. Those studied will be Johannes Kepler, Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Albert Einstein, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and James Watson.

In addition, each student is expected to select an additional scientist to read about, and discuss his reading with the instructor.

Readings: Arthur Koestler, The Watershed; E. N. Andrade, Sir Isaac Newton; Charles Darwin, Autobiography; Heinar Kipphard, In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer; James D. Watson, The Double Helix; and some articles."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974 / Spring 1974

NOTE: There are minor variations in the description text from Fall 1972 through Spring 1974, but all are essentially the same. (- Ed.)
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  THE NATURE OF PHYSICAL THEORY:
Science as Inquiry
Michael Kamrin, Fall 1972

 
"This course will deal with science as a process rather than science as knowledge. We will investigate how science is done in practice, rather than in theory, and will study what factors influence the course of science. We will emphasize the importance of culture and will study its influence historically up to the present by examining man's changing views of his place in the universe.

Texts: The Black Cloud by F. Hoyle; The Watershed by A. Koestler"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974 / Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  THE NATURE OF PHYSICAL THEORY:
Man's Changing Views of the Universe
Lois Zimring, Winter 1974

 
"Man's view of the physical universe and his position within it have changed drastically from the beginnings of his observations and speculations to the present -- and will in all probability continue to do so. We shall trace the evolution of these changes by examining the fundamentally different assumptions involved -- why they were proposed, why they were often resisted, and some of their implications not only for science but for society as a whole.

Texts: Louise B. Young, Exploring the Universe, Paul W. Hodge, Concepts of the Universe"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  BIOLOGICAL CONTINUITY: JMC 122A (Overview)

 
"Theory of the gene. Molecular explanations of heredity. Some aspects and implications of human heredity. Background material in cell structure and function in reproduction."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: 'Biological Continuity' was designated JMC 122A. Individual topics were explored within particular sections under this rubric.


NATURAL SCIENCE:  MAN IN THE NATURAL WORLD: JMC 123A (Overview)

 
"The great controversies which have centered around man's attempts to explain the origin of the earth's features and the diversity of life on earth. Analysis of these controversies, their social impact, and man's place in the biological world."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: 'Man in the Natural World' was designated JMC 123A. Individual topics were explored within particular sections under this rubric.


NATURAL SCIENCE:  MAN IN THE NATURAL WORLD: JMC 123B (Overview)

 
"Laboratory or independent study in the nature of man in the natural world."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  MAN IN THE NATURAL WORLD
The Fitness of the Environment
Charles R. Peebles, Spring 1974

 
"The ecological environment and natural history of plants, birds, and other wildlife in their spring environment are studied in areas on or near campus, as the weather permits. Appropriate clothing and footwear should be worn. In the classroom the impact of urbanization and population growth on various ecosystems also is considered and the development of a new environmental ethic is examined.

Texts: Commoner, Barry, The Closing Circle; Emmel, Thomas C., An Introduction to Ecology and Population Biology; Smithsonian Insitution, The Fitness of Man's Environment."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 229A (Overview)

 
"Special interdisciplinary studies related to the natural sciences. Independent study enrolled for under this number cna be for variable credit, 1 - 4 exclusively or as specified. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 8 credits if different topic is taken."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: 'Interdisciplinary Studies in Natural Science' was designated JMC 229A. Individual topics were explored within particular sections under this rubric.


NATURAL SCIENCE:  INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 229B (Overview)

 
"Independent interdisciplinary study related to the natural sciences. Independent study enrolled for under this number can be for variable credits, 1 - 4 exlusively or as specified. Students may enroll for a maximum of 8 credits if different topic is taken.

Independent study arranged with a JMC faculty member in the Natural Sciences."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: JMC 229B was the independent study component of the Nat Sci curricular offerings.


NATURAL SCIENCE:  INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 229A
Feasibility of Total Paper Recycling for the MSU Campus
Ron Wilson, Fall 1972

 
As described under 'Field Education Courses' (cf. Field Education entry elsewhere on this webpage):

"The goal of this course is to prepare a workable community-wide plan for recycling paper at MSU. To do this we will do a comprehensive audit of all paper products entering the campus and will monitor paper products leaving the campus. We will also need to research the various recycling techniques and their availability in Michigan. Enrollment by Permission Only."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE: JMC 320A (Overview)

 
"Studies of the interaction between the natural sciences and selected aspects of culture. Implications of the sciences for national and international problems. The relations of science and the humanities."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: 'Science and Culture' was designated JMC 320A. Individual topics were explored within particular sections under this rubric.


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
The Physicists
Leonard Isaacs, Fall 1972

 
"The experience of being a physicist in the 20th century has been a wondrous mixture of intellectual adventure and political disaster. The ideas of physics and the lives of its practitioners have, in fact, been so intertwined in the fabric of recent history that it is impossible to interpret the 20th century without considering them -- which is the reason for this course. It will attempt to investigate our century by examining the life and times of its physicists: Albert Einstein, George Gamow, Ernest Lawrence, J. Robert Oppenheimer, the new team-scientists who run the 'big machines', and the fictional scientists who tenant the sanatorium of Durrenmatt's play (which also provides the title for the course).

Class will be seminar-style. The emphasis will be on the interactions between science and culture rather than on the technical content of the scientific theories. (Obviously, a biography of Einstein must deal with Relativity Theory, and an account of experimental physicists working on a particle accelerator must deal with the scientific questions they hope to answer, but this material should be viewed as helping to provide background information, and the student will not be held responsible for it in a technical sense.) Ideally, this course should be taken after a 121 course."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972

"I remember Len showing how science was a creative and artistic endeavor rather than a cold process of "discovery." Another example of JMC anticipating postmodernism, and in a far more useful way to my way of thinking."

- Mark Jaede, December 2002
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
Heresy in Science
Michael Kamrin, Fall 1972

 
"The aim of this course is to help the student to a better understanding of how science is actually practiced today. The vehicle for this will be a number of case studies of instances where new ideas were treated as heresies by the scientific establishment. The two examples to be studied in most detail are Velikovsky's theories regarding the historical accuracy of celestial events described in various ancient manuscripts and Pauling's theories regarding the relationship of vitamin therapy to health.

Texts: Worlds in Collision by I. Velikovsky; Vitamin C and the Common Cold by L. Pauling"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
Darwin and the Apes
James Goatley, Fall 1973

 
"This course will examine (1) the life of Charles Darwin, (2) his work as one of the major ideas in the sciences, and (3) evolution by natural selection as a case history in the acceptance and cultural incorporation of a new idea.

Some of the material, paritcularly in the early part of the term, will be covered by lecture. However, it is hoped that participation of the class will make this predominately a discussion class. Examination will be by essay questions, some of which will be take home. Although knowledge of some essential factual material is expected, the exams will place weight on your ability to deal with the ideas and issues raised.

Texts:

  • Philip Appleman, editor, Darwin
  • William Irvine, Apes, Angels and Victorians"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
Politics and Environment
Lawrence Besaw, Fall 1973

 
"It is the feeling of this instructor that the environment is probably the number one crisis facing this nation or world we leave to the citizens of tomorrow, and may well decide the future of the human race. This course will look historically at some of the cultural and technological reasons for the current environmental problems, and will consider various political, industrial, and sociological solutions to these problems."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
Mathematics and Learning Theory
John Masterson, Spring 1974

 
"The goal of this course is to introduce mathematics, in various ways, into the meaningful enjoyable part of the lives of students who generally have little need for, or interest in, the subject. This will be done by:

  1. Examining recent learning theory as it relates to mathematics and the translation of this theory into new methods of teaching in elementary and secondary schools.
  2. Looking at some classical problems - ancient and modern - in the history of mathematics.
  3. Working with real problems, games, puzzles, solving them, generalizing them and examining what value there might be in spending time solving the problems.

There will be no examinations. Students will be expected to read selections from the works of such people as J. Holt, J. Piaget, J. Bruner, Skinner and others and participate actively in (1), (2), and (3). Students may also develop individual research projects and will be graded on their participation and the project."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
Science and Literature
Charles R. Peebles and John Schroeder, Spring 1974

 
"We enjoy poetry because it stirs our imagination and creates in us a specific emotional response. Perhaps the same is true for a scientific theory, or should be. Donne, Pope, Blake, Wordsworth, Frost and others wrote verse of spontaneity and grace which at the same time examined the scientific and technological change of their day. Poetic themes of order, mutability, alienation, and social conscience merge with the developing concepts of atomism, evolution, and ecosystems. This course attempts to study the aspect of nature, without idealization, using the concentrated and imaginative awareness of experience expressed in poetry.

Texts:

  • Douglas Bush, Science and English Poetry
  • J. Bronowski, Science and Human Values
  • J. J. Cadden and P. R. Brostowin, Science and Literature"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
The Biological 'Revolution'
Alwynelle Ahl, Spring 1974

 
"The 'Industrial Revolution' begun in the 17th century has transformed society as the theories of physical science were applied to the technical problems of the times. Biological science theories have been developed to the point of wide application at this time, and it appears that we are in the midst of a 'biological revolution'. How far, how fast, how widely, and to whom will our new bio-technologies be applied? Will scientists alone decide these questions? Will we leave these questions to be decided by chaotic processes of consumer demand? Since we are discussing our own humanity and its possible manipulation, it behooves us to look carefully at bio-technology in the past and present, and think carefully about the possibilities for the future. This course will discuss several selected technologies of the past and present, and their effects on society. The present capabilities and future possibilities of bio-technology will also be discussed. The course has a lecture-discussion format."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
Anatomy and Destiny: A Biologist Looks at Women
Alwynelle Ahl, Spring 1974

 
"No one questions the existence of sexual dimorphism in Homo sapiens; the joys and sorrows of 'vive la différence' are well known by many. The question arises, however, as to how these differences in anatomy and physiology have been used as a basis for determining social roles and a division of labor between the sexes. Is the present societal dominance of males biological pre-ordained or is it a result of ancient habits and social structures which perpetuate the present imbalance? This course will review the known biological differences in human males and females and attempt to assess the possible contribution these differences could make to behavior in social roles.

Readings are from a wide variety of authors including Money, Ehrhardt, and Sherfey. The course will have a lecture-discussion format."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE
Biomedical Ethics
Howard Brody, Spring 1974

 
"This course will explore the ethical and social implications of current developments in biology and medicine. After an introduction to conceptual bases for biomedical research and practice and the interrelationships between science, technology, and human values, attention will be devoted to certain specific problem areas and to the consideration of rational decision-making approaches toward solutions. The student will also be introduced to sources of up-to-date information on advances in biology and medicine, medical ethics, and biomedical social policies.

Among the topics that may be considered are: means of financing and regulating medical care; allocation of societal resources for health care and research; use of human subjects in research; withholding treatment from various segments of the population; euthanasia; genetic engineering; and control of behavior."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE:
Science and Religion: Issues and Syntheses
Fred Graham and James Goatley, Winter 1974

 
See course description listed under 'Religion'. This illustrates how certain interdisciplinary JMC courses could be taken for credit in one of multiple disciplinary divisions.

NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE:
Studies in Science, Ethics and Society
James Goatley, Winter 1974

 
"This class will engage in some of the social and ethical problems posed by recent or potential developments in the natural sciences, particularly biology and medicine. Examples of these problems are behavior control, genetic manipulation, population control, organ transplantation, psychosurgery, and definitions of death. These and a number of other issues will be introduced through a series of readings and discussed in class the early part of the term. Subsequently, members of the class will work independently on selected issues ...

Each member of the class will be expected to write three papers, each dealing with one of the issues raised. All class members are expected to participate in the class discussion."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  SCIENCE AND CULTURE:
Artistic Output: Computer Graphics
William Kolomyjec and James Burnett, Winter 1974

 
"It is not necessary to be an artist to know good or bad (ugly) design. It is not necessary to be a computer technician or programmer to know what a computer is and can do. Can something as subjective as art be produced using the computer as a medium? This course will examine the computer: what it does and can do. this course will also examine rudimentary design elements: shapes, form, rhythm, balance, grouping, etc. After some understanding of these things is obtained, we shall look at a new area of art, Computer Graphics -- art generated by an artist using a computer as a 'tool'. The latter part of the course will use several of these design fundamentals together with the computer as our media and experiment in generating art."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

Editor's NOTE:  This course was offered a decade before the first graphics user interface with which most people are familiar (the Apple Macintosh).


NATURAL SCIENCE:  STUDIES IN SCIENCE: JMC 321A (Overview)

 
"Studies in selected topics and areas of natural science."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

NOTE: 'Studies in Science' was designated JMC 321A. Individual topics were explored within particular sections under this rubric.


NATURAL SCIENCE:  STUDIES IN SCIENCE:
Our Malnourished Planet
Doris Narins, Fall 1972

 
"This course offers students two options by dividing the material into:

  1. core lectures (Monday and Tuesday) attended by all students and addressing the following questions among others: What nutrients does man need to take in via food? What are the most common nutritional diseases in the world today? in the United States? In Michigan? in East Lansing? What does it mean to a child if he does not eat enough protein during his pre-school years? Does it change his life expectance? Or his ability to learn? Or his chances of dying of measles? and

  2. Two alternate lectures between which the student may elect. Alternate A (Thursdays) will be more discussions of basic nutrition. Alternate B (Fridays) will discuss topics such as: What does it mean to a country, Peru, for example, that approximately 50% of its adult population has suffered protein deprivation during childhood?
"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  STUDIES IN SCIENCE:
Conversations on Modern Physics
H. G. Blosser, Fall 1972

 
"This course is intended for non-science students; its objective is to give the student a conceptual picture of developments on the research frontier of physics. The discussion topics covered will included most of the great surprises of 20th century physics including: (1) the Einstein theory of relativity with its prediction of longer life for fast moving objects (including people), (2) the quantum theory with its uncertainty principle and its stress on observables, (3) the 'parity' puzzle and its implication that sub-microscopic particles can tell right from left, (4) the intriguing 'family trees' of the subnuclear worlds and the impressive order which results from the introduction of the 'strangeness' quantum, and (5) the huge machines measured in miles which are needed to study particles measured in subtrillionths ... Also newpaper articles on important scientific accomplishments will be reviewed as they appear (primarily New York Times). The student will be expected to participate in discussions, to write summaries of topics discussed, to report on collateral reading, and to spend some time observing and/or assisting some MSU research team and reporting on his observations. The role of mathematics in physics discovery will be discussed by no specific skill in mathematics will be expected or needed."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  STUDIES IN SCIENCE:
The Sources of Animal and Human Behavior
Lawrence Besaw, Fall 1973

 
"This course will center on the idea that the behavior of any animal is an adaptive result of natural selection as innate and acquired responses are developed to cope with the physical habitat, influence of other species, and competition within the same species.

Various types of animal behavior, some stranger than fiction, will be studied to demonstrate the role of evolution and heredity in the behavioral responses of animals.

This course will attempt to answer the question: Can the behavior of Man be explained by evolutionary and hereditary principles?"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  STUDIES IN SCIENCE:
Twentieth Century Theories of the Structure of Matter
Lois Zimring, Winter 1974

 
"The scientist's view of the structure of matter has changed fundamentally since the turn of the century. ... We shall examine, in a relatively nonmathematical way, the interaction between observations and theoretical frameworks that led to this changing view of the atom. To the extent that time permits, we shall look at the implications -- both for the other sciences and, ultimately, other aspects of man's society as well -- of the basically different philosophies encountered. Some exposure to high school algebra will be assumed.

Texts:

  • Gamow, Thirty Years that Shook Physics
  • Einstein, Relativity, the Special and General Theory
  • Selections from Bohr, Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


NATURAL SCIENCE:  STUDIES IN SCIENCE:
Energy and the Environment
Gerald Crawley (Coordinator) + Others, Spring 1974

 
"Do we have the resources (fossil fuels, nuclear, fusion, solar) to meet the growing demand for energy? Even if we do, are there other problems which arise with an ever increasing energy use? If at some point we have to limit our use of energy what will be the social, economic, or political implications? These and other related questions will be discussed in this course.

Many of the lectures will be given by experts in the various areas.

There are no prerequisites and majors in all areas are encouraged to take the course to be better informed as citizens on this important topic. The emphasis will be on written work, readings and discussion. Readings for the course will be drawn from Scientific American, Physics Today, and the New York Times. Handouts will also be used extensively.

This JMC section is integrated with a course jointly sponsored by the Physics Department and Briggs College. The morning lectures serve all groups. The afternoon discussion hour is for the JMC class only."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PHILOSOPHY:  JMC 232A (Overview)

 
"Study in the discipline of philosophy with selected thinkers, methods, and issues. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Spring 1974
 


PHILOSOPHY:  JMC 232B: Independent Study (Overview)

 
Independent study in the field of Philosophy. Sometimes used as an adjunct to a 232A Philosophy course. For example (cf. Hurrell's 'Open Questions in Personal Inquiry', Spring 1974):

"Students extend the pattern of study in 232A to include one additional approved source, and follow the method of in-progress written responses, as part of the broader study.

Although different uses of this credit may be approved, it is recommended generally that students select reading in one of the philosophers which the class will encounter in discussing Reck, Speculative Philosophy."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PHILOSOPHY:  (Precise Course Title Unknown)
Herbert Garelick, Fall 1966 (?)

 
"The mention of Herbert Garelick brought back different memories. I had a special topics philosophy class from him, probably fall, 1966, that was the best and scariest of my undergraduate years. I don't recall the title, but it was something to do with the nature of knowledge.

The mannerism I recall is him coming into this very small class, and beginning with a question. And then he would sit (often cross-legged on the table) smoking his pipe until someone dared to answer. He would just out-wait us. But then he would take the answer and reshape it into another question that led us deeper into the problem at hand. I have never since seen anyone use the Socratic Method so effectively. The whole semester we all felt as though we were racing along, always just short of out-of-control, but understanding things we hadn't imagined."

- Robert Hawkins, January 2003
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Existentialism(? - Precise Course Title Unknown)
Edmund (Ed) Byrne, 1968 and/or 1969

 
"He taught at least one course in JMC, but I think that he offered that course more than once during 1968/69. I believe that it was a course on Existentialism."

- Keith Fleeman, April 2003
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Existentialism versus Marxism
Albert Cafagna, Fall 1969

 
One of my inaugural JMC classes my first freshman quarter was 'Existentialism versus Marxism', taught by Albert Cafagna of the MSU Philosophy Department. Cafagna was a regular (and a favorite) visiting professor in JMC, and his longstanding JMC presence exemplified the concept of having University faculty create and teach special topics courses in the JMC environment.

In accordance with JMC's 'heuristic learning' concept, the course jumped over the basic introductions and launched straight into review of issues and principles for each of the movements individually and a comparative analysis of the two of them.

As was the case with the best of the JMC topical courses, the lectures were challenging in the sense that we had to stretch to grasp the implications of points many of which we were hearing for the first time. This pedagogical approach used no 'stick', but kept the 'carrot' of understanding just far enough ahead of our noses to motivate us to continuously work to keep up.

- Randy Whitaker
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Cosmos and Tragedy
Paul Hurrell, Fall 1972

 
"In conjuncton with courses offereed by Dr. Wright in Literature and Dr. Johnson in Political Science, the theme of tragedy is explored from key points of view in Philosophy. Persons enrolled in any one of these three companion courses may also take the coordinating seminar, team taught as JMC 499...

Contrasts between Aristotle and Nietzsche are developed as a background base for individual directions of study. One seems to step into different universes in viewing tragedy through the eyes of different authors, interpreters, audiences. Questions of human freedom, hopes, good and evil, mix with questions of causality and powers beyond human control. Yet despite divergences in the ordering of ideas and experience, one dips into pervasively shared reaches of human experience. In the light of the factors which come to a focus in tragedy, a question worth considering is the following: Is your universe too small for tragedy? Or, possibly it's too big.

A number of suggestions for optional directions of study emerge with consideration of the textbooks: Kaufmann, Tragedy and Philosophy; Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Existentialism: Love as Fact and Value
Paul Hurrell, Fall 1972

 
"This course may be taken either on an arranged pattern or a regular pattern. Requirements are coordinated with those of PHL 323, with which it is jointly listed. On the regular patter, the jointly listed courses will be conducted as one course.

The approach of Martin Buber is developed as a key illustration of important issues, and alternative points of view, such as Kierkegaard and Sartre, are introduced by comparison and contrast. Students develop individual directions of study in relation to common background material and issues.

To pursue interpretations of love is to encounter personal, interpersonal, ethical, political, scientific and religious issues. To what extent is the reality of love amenable to scientific inquiry? Does the reality of love transcend the reality of human love? If all organisms were destroyed, would love be destroyed? Does love provide an ethic?

Since the variety of directions for optional study is suited to considerable differences in background, the instructor is willing to approve some arranged patterns for individual or group study, provided that a specific plan can be agreed upon at the beginning of the term. Two texts are required: Martin Buber, I and Thou ...; William A. Sadler, Existence and Love ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Problems of Mysticism and Skepticism: Group and Arranged Studies
Paul Hurrell, Fall 1973

 
"Students are invited to defend and compare views of personal interest, in the context of basic philosophical issues. Key problems of belief, epxerience, evidence, communication and consistency emerge as mystics and skeptics try to express themselves. ... Highly instructive issues stem not only from basic features of mysticism and skepticism, but also from their opposition. An understanding of the philosophical disagreements in which they find themselves is one of the goals which students are encouraged to adopt.

Optional patterns of reading, class participation and presentation, reading notes, papers, etc., provide a basis for each student to submit a schedule of the work intended for credit. Since directions of research are substantially open, enrollment for this section may be utilized for arranged studies, for self-orientation to basic views and problems in philosophy."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Existentialism: Perspectives on Decision, Deception, and Paradox
Paul Hurrell, Fall 1973

 
"The course begins with an orientation to selected issus and points of view, as a basis for closer examination of Sartre's analysis of 'bad faith' -- which Kaufman reads as 'self-deception'.

Initial comparisons center in Kierkegaard and Sartre, locating related questions of paradox, objectivity, freedom and commitment. A review of key questions in the perspective of Buber illustrates how some questions are relieved and others are reinforced when a different approach is adopted. As problems of awareness and standpoint come to the fore, some views of Heidegger are introduced.

...As points raised in the account of self-deception relate to broader issues which have emerged in the orientation, areas for further study will be noted. From the orientation material, each student selects a topic or author for special emphasis. Although assigned materials on self-deception should be included by everyone, there is ample room for topics to vary with the interests of the students."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Moral Issues and Theory
Martin Benjamin, Fall 1973

 
"The course will begin with a consideration of various arguments encountered in everyday life on such topics as cheating, war crimes, military obligations, crime and punishment, sex, and violence. After developing some skill in identifying such arguments, we will set out to appraise them. Before long, however, we will discover that moral arguments generally appeal, explicitly or implicitly, to some moral principle or other. Thus we will undertake an investigation and assessment of two of the most importantion contributions to moral theory: Mill's Utilitarianism and Kant's Categorical Imperative. The course will conclude with applications of what we will have learned about moral arguments, principle and theories to some current problems chosen (by the class) from among the following: abortion; punishment; the obligation to obey the law; ecology and obligations to future generations; the obligation to relieve suffering; war, violence and pacifism.

It should be be emphasized that since this course will be cross-listed with PHL 101, it is unlikely that class size will permit the sort of extended discussion that the subject matter deserves and that JMC students may have become accustomed to. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Ways of Dialogue: Plato
Paul Hurrell, Winter 1974

 
"The dialogues of Plato, at once great philosophy and great literature, reflect the wide ranging interests of a remarkably creative person. In Plato's hands, the dialogue form is an important process of inquiry, serving to identify important problems of knowledge, value, self, society, education, etc., as well as to explore approaches to their resolution.

Participation in the process of dialogue, with Plato as a guide to the issues, is the basis for this course in philosophy. Selections from the dialogues will be developed in class, with students as participants. Individual exploratory reading in Plato is also pursued, not only for background but also to locate issues of special concern to the student. Students choose a topic of interest as the basis for a concise paper, relating an issue in Plato to some present author's point of view."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Moral and Legal Change
Paul Hurrell, Winter 1974

 
"Students enrolled for this course may either proceed with the group in class or develop an approved direction of independent study.

Students working through the class session will begin with required readings drawn from the following texts:

  • John Gardner, Self-Renewal
  • Basil Mitchell, Law, Morality and Religion in a Secular Society

On the basis of the development of issues in class, topics of interest are identified which may provide the basis for a concise paper. Each student selects optional reading pertinent to his topic of interest, as a supplement to the required readings.

In exploring the interplay between moral and legal issues, pervasive problems of freedom and coercion come to the fore. Under what conditions is force justified? Although individuals in the class may focus upon problems of pornography, heart transplants, etc., they will be expected to consider what basic social conditions would be like, if desirable changes are to be brought about."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Open Questions in Personal Inquiry
Paul Hurrell, Spring 1974

 
"An open question is one that, given our tendency to a particular belief, we cannot answer and cannot avoid. It 'has that kind of power', if Alburey Castell is correct. His advice is that we learn to live with open questions. My advice is that we learn through them, with growth in awareness marking important dimensions of personal inquiry.

As Castell notes, such questions turn up both in one's own philosophical meditations and in the history of philosophy. Classes introduce students to open points of dialogue with some of the great creative thinkers. Needs for class attendance will vary, as will optional projects for credit. Nowever, each member of the class, including the instructor, will be expected to follow a method of in-progress written responses to readings, as the basis for developing a concise, organized paper on one issue of interest.

Textbooks:

  • A. Castell, The Self in Philosophy
  • A. J. Reck, Speculative Philosophy
  • J. K. Roth (Ed.), The Moral Philosophy of William James"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PHILOSOPHY:
To Be or Not to Be (To Exist or Not to Exist?)
Paul Hurrell and Mary Jim Josephs, Spring 1974

 
See description under Literature 231A

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PHILOSOPHY:
Masculine / Feminine Liberation: Scope & Significance
Diane Coin, Spring 1974

 
"After familiarizing himself with certain texts covering the spectrum of issues bearing on sexism, each participant will choose a more limited topic on which to do fairly extensive research which will then be presented to the group for critical discussion of the arguments and positions covered. Each participant will be asked to critically discuss the work of at least one other member of the group, and finalized papers will be due at term's end.

It is hoped that the course format will enable participants to (1) engage in philosophic dialogue by thinking critically and arguing rationally; (2) acquire techniques for self-education and independent research; (3) appreciate the depth of the social, political, psychological, and moral implications of sexism; and (4) discover the defining qualities of personhood which transcend sexual difference. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE: JMC 252A: (Overview)

 
"Study in the discipline of political science with selected periods, topics, and issues. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE: (?)
Democratic Traditions in the Progressive Era
(Charles?) Hirschfeld, Fall 1966

 
"I did two papers: one on Jane Addams, one comparing Dubois and Booker T. Washington."

- Julie Leininger (Pycior), October 2003
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
... Latin America ... (Precise Title Unknown)
Harold Johnson, 1967

 
"...[I]n '67 or so Harold Johnson taught a Political Science course about Latin America."

- Julie Leininger (Pycior), October 2003
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
Something to do with Election(s)? (Precise Title Unknown)
Harold Johnson, Spring 1968

 
"...[Harold Johnson] did a whole mock political convention in the spring of 1968. It was very eventful...; ... it deserves its own discussion."

- Julie Leininger (Pycior), October 2003
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE: (?)
Democratic Traditions in the Progressive Era
Professor Hirschfield, Fall 1966

 
"I did two papers: one on Jane Addams, one comparing Dubois and Booker T. Washington."

- Julie Leininger (Pycior), October 2003
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
Politics '72 - Voter Project
Harold Johnson, Fall 1972

 
As described under 'Field Education Courses' (cf. Field Education entry elsewhere on this webpage):

"Students will research the voting patterns and study the factors by survey that facilitate or inhibit the use of voting among minorities in selected Lansing neighborhoods. The project will try to increase voter turn out by use of issue debates in those neighborhoods, and other facilitating activity."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
Inside Government
Harold Johnson, Fall 1972

 
As described under 'Field Education Courses' (cf. Field Education entry elsewhere on this webpage):

"Students will work with selected Michigan legislators and committees of the Ingham County Board of Commissioners doing research for and preparation of legislation. In seminars students will share their insight into the legislative process and substance of the issues they are studying."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
The Anatomy of Nationalism
Harold Johnson, Fall 1973

 
"An examination of the concept of nationalism as a basis for understanding the psychology of world politics, the dynamics of social mobilization, and the evolution of an international community, with reference to the forces which have shaped the foreign policies of various nations in a period of revolutionary international activity."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
Partnership or Confrontation? Poor Lands and Rich
Harold Johnson, Fall 1973

 
"An analysis of the sociological, political, and economic problems which affect the confrontation between the developed and developing countries. There is a special effort to examine the nature of the various political systems involved in resolving the problems: national, regional and international. Class will develop a simulation kit."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
The Atlantic Fantasy: The U.S., NATO, and Europe
Harold Johnson, Fall 1973

 
"Within the next several months the U.S. will be reassessing its commitments within the Atlantic Alliance. With the expansion of the European Economic Community, Europe will be assuming an altered role in international political and economic affairs. It will be the focus of this seminar to examine these trends and alternatives. Part of the course design will involve a simulated foreign ministers conference."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
After Watergate, What?
Harold Johnson, Winter 1974

 
"A focused study of aspects of the political processes which define and clarify the character, style, vision, and accountability of the contemporary politician. Particular emphasis will be directed toward the relevant issues generated by the Congressional review of campaign practices, including Congressional-Executive Relations, media influence, and judicial review."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
Transnational Relations and World Politics
Harold Johnson, Spring 1974

 
"A significant degree of intersocietal intercourse takes place without government control. Entities other than nation-states are frequently important international or transnational actors, i.e., Vatican, Arabian-American Oil Company, ITT. It is the intent of this course to examine the identity and influence of corporate bodies which influence international behavior. Special emphasis will be placed on the multinational corporations."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY: JMC 251A: (Overview)

 
"Study in the discipline of psychology with selected schools, topics, and figures. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Studies in Psychology
Alan Friedman, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973

 
"Students will be given the opportunity to choose and then research in detail a topic related to any of the following areas: developmental psychology, clinical psychology, personality and psychotherapy, or social psychology.

Responsibility for topic selection, research, either of an experimental or survey nature, and final reporting will be with the individual. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Personal Causation
Alan Friedman, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973 / Winter 1974

 
"How much inner control do individuals have over their own lives? Maslow says, "Inner nature as much as we know of it so far, seems not to be intrinsically evil, but rather either neutral or positively good." This class will approach the study of inner-directed behavior through perspectives provided by Rogers, Perls, Watts, Frankl, Laing, Harris, Keleman and Lowen. The format of the class will include discussions, presentations and experience."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 /Fall 1973 / Winter 1974

NOTE: This course's description is identical across all cited terms, with only slight variations in phrasing and occasional shifts in the thinkers cited. (-Ed.)
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Psychology: Personal and Group Development
Roger Stimson, Fall 1972

 
"The course is an attempt to implement a philosophy of experience based learning through personal encounter in groups for the purpose of long range individual growth and development. The method of teaching encourages participats to develop solutions for themselves and their group. The teach relinquishes the usual role of leadership and functions as a participant-observer committed to the facilitation of a climate of trust, reality communication, goal integration and interdependence.

An important element of the course is experience in a human relations laboratory. The group environment provides a learning situation which is, in part, emotional and provides the opportunity to explore the interdependece of emotional and intellectual learning.

The goals of the human relations laboratory are: 1). Self-awareness: increased awareness of one's feelings and reactions to others and their impact on self. 2). Self-disclosure: increased ability to genuinely reveal self, understanding of effect of self-disclosure on others, skill in handling self-disclosure from others. 3). Taking out membership: Skill in working through variations of non-involvement, understanding mechanism of self-defeat, assumption of responsibility for learning, developing trust and helping create the environment of trust."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Psychology: Psychology of Therapeutic Change
Roger Stimson, Fall 1972

 
"A survey of the change process employed in various psychotherapies. Included in the study will be the approaches of Frenk, Rogers, Ellis, Bern, Perls, May, Assagioli and Janov. The class will be conducted as a seminar. Films and audio-tape demonstrations will be used when available.

Texts: Harper, R., Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy: 36 Systems; Peterson, S., A Catalog of the Ways People Grown."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Psychological Measurement
Roger Stimson, Fall 1973 / Winter 1974

 
"An introduction to methods of measurement covering intelligence, aptitude, interest and personality. Students will have the opportunity to take a selected sample of standard tests and to design sample tests of their own. Concepts of validity, reliability, error and variance will be covered."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Winter 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Theories of Personality and Abnormality (Fall 1973)
Concepts of Abnormality in Personality Theory (Winter 1974)
Roger Stimson, Fall 1973 / Winter 1974

 
"A survey of major theories of personality in relation to varoius definitions of abnormality. Exploration of personality types, life patterns, styles and scripts. Investigation of conventional and non-conventional approaches to human experience. Readings in Psychoanalysis, Rational Therapy, Gestalt Therapy and Transactional Analysis."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Winter 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Seminar in Advanced Psychological Studies: Group Growth
Roger Stimson, Fall 1973 / Winter 1974 / Spring 1974

 
"Exploration of selected topics and methods within Clinical Psychology. An experience based learning context designed to facilitate both conceptual development and personal growth. Students will be expected to participate in a weekly growth group in addition to participation in a weekly theory seminar. Readings in Berne, Steiner, Schiff, James, and Jongeward."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Winter 1974 / Spring 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
The Psychology of Change: Permission and Persuasion
Roger Stimson, Spring 1974

 
"An investigation of the process of change from the perspective of permission and persuasion. Exploration of the social psychology of the role behavior involved, the communication system, and the attitudes and values present. Study of such topics as public and personal propaganda, advertising, religious conversion, demon possession, hypnotism, yoga and psychotherapy. Students will work on independent research in areas of interest and make presentations to the class.

Texts:

  • Fish, Placebo Therapy
  • Haley, The Power Tactics of Jesus Christ
  • Castenada, The Journey to Ixtlan"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
The Psychological Basis of Sport
Alan Friedman, Spring 1974

 
"The course deals with the why's and what's of sport from a psychological perspective. We will consider motivation, achievement, competition, affiliation and personality in terms of their effects in sport and games. The main work of the course will be an in-depth study of one team or performer chosen by each class member. The text for the course is Sport and Society: An Anthology edited by Talamini and Page."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Behavioral Research - Method or Madness?
Judy Frankmann, Spring 1974

 
"The major premise of the course is that intensive exposure to a variety of experimental problems will lead to insights into the design of research and the extraction of information from research reports. Consideration will be given to planning experiments, making the most of the results (data snooping) and interpreting what has happened. Selected readings will be assigned for critical review and research papers will be written. Some statistics can be included, but this subject is not contemplated unless requested by participants of the class.

Text: Neale, J. M. and Liebert, R. M. Science and Behavior - An Introduction to Methods of Research ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


PSYCHOLOGY:
Memory, Perception and Language
Judith Frankmann, Spring 1974

 
"Revolutionary changes in the study of language have occurred in the last decade. Two developments that have had major impacts are: (1) the new field of psycholinguistics within psychology, and (2) Chomsky's linguistic theory of transformational grammar. Research from these two areas will be examined and discussed with an emphasis on how human beings process language.

Selected readings from linguistics and psycholinguistics."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


RELIGION: JMC 233A (Overview)

 
"Study in the discipline of religion with selected religions, figures, literature, and topics. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


RELIGION:
Religious Experience: An Investigation of Religious Ecstasy
Fred Graham, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973

 
"This course will introduce the student to religious phenomena not ordinarily investigated as part of course-work, for we shall concentrate on religious ecstasy. Although we shall read fairly widely -- using Carl Jung for psychological grounding, as well as advocates of ecstatic for their personal insights -- the course will also drive the student out of the classroom and into pentecostal and spiritualist assemblies. (Unless he can find other brands of ecstasy on his / her own.) This means that most students must invest several weekend chunks of time, in addition to the scheduled classes. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973
 


RELIGION:
Evangelism in America
Fred Graham, Fall 1972

 
"Because evangelism has been endemic to the American religious scene since the Great Awakening of the 1730's, and has continued to break out from time to time in widely popular revivals, and because there is a massive campaign planned for October by the Billy Graham Associates in cooperation with about 100 local churches in the Lansing area, it seems opportune to examine this phenomenon with some rigor, giving attention to historical background, sociological scenery, and both the 'spirit' and the 'mechanics' observable locally. This means that most of the student independent studies will relate to the local experience, hence some interviewing, attendance at rallies, etc., will be part of the course. The student need not feel he must 'approve' or 'disapprove' of evangelism in order to take the course: just that he be willing to work. 1 exam, 1 paper."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


RELIGION:
American Jewish Experience
Fred Graham and Bev Wiener, Fall 1972

 
"This course will be a preliminary investigation of the Jewish experience in America. To gain a historical perspective, we will begin with a book on Jewish history. As we move into the heart of our study we'll read some contemporary American short stories for their insights into the role of tradition, the process of relating the Jewish heritage to the American culture, and the place of Zionism for the American Jew. In addition, we shall read conflicting accounts of the contemporary meanings of Judaism. Each student will complete a paper or project and take a final exam. Regular attendance is expected."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


RELIGION:
Jesus: Son of God to Superstar
Fred Graham, Fall 1973

 
"The title indicates that we shall look at both biblical-theological interpretations of Jesus of Nazareth, but also other interesting, but possibly more humanistic, views. Included in the reading list are the Gospels, a series of plays called The Man Born to be King (Sayers), The Passover Plot (Schonfield), The Last Temptation of Christ (Katzanzakis), The Man Nobody Knows (Barbon), Jesus Rediscovered (Muggeridge), plus bits and pieces of other material. We shall listen to music as well, and possibly include a film. The exams will all be 'hurdles' to get over, each student being required to pass each quiz, even if it means taking it over and over and over... Lots of reading, but a small amount of writing compared to most JMC courses."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


RELIGION:
Destruction or Rebirth? The Roman Catholic Church in Crisis
Fred Graham and Rev. John Foglio, Fall 1973 / Spring 1974

 
"...In this course a Roman Catholic priest and a Protestant historian-theologian will work with the students through an assortment of switten material and personal observation to give everyone in the class (including instructors) an opportunity to make a personal assessment of where the Church is today and where it may be heading. Attention will be paid to classical dogma, new theological formulation, the Council, the last three popes, Catholic Revolutionaries, Catholic Pentecostals and the predictions of self-styled futurists. Some small involvement or observation of contemporary worship forms will also be required."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973 / Spring 1974
 


RELIGION:
The Theological Scene Today
Fred Graham, Winter 1974

 
"During a period of religious enthusiasm characterized in the U.S. by Pentecostal fervor, incursion of Eastern gurus, the Jesus Movement, and the growth of conservative churches, theological thought per se has not had the popularity it did a few years ago, when Honest to God and Death of God theologies made headlines. But this course will be a "head trip", as we try to see where the theologians are today. Several Protestant and Catholic theologians will be studied (including the Jesuit paleontologist-theologian Teilhard de Chardin and the conservative Protestant evangelical Francis (Shaeffer), a black theology, and process theology and a theology of revolution... "

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


RELIGION:
Science and Religion: Issues and Syntheses
Fred Graham and James Goatley, Winter 1974

 
"Science and religion intersect with one another at several levels. On one level, for example, the technology derived from science may challenge the ethical values derived from a religious perspective. At another level theology and theoretical science may clash in the understandings they claim of man's position in the universe and his relation to the natural world.

This course deals with conflicts of the latter kind and uses some perspectives of philosophy to analyze them. We will examine certain broad areas where science and religion have been or may be in conflict or in which they bear on common problems from discrete perspectives. We shall study the roles of science and religion in shaping world views or attempting grand syntheses of knowledge, both 'sacred' and 'profane'."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


RELIGION:
A Study of Religious Reformations
Fred Graham, Winter 1974

 
"This study of the world's religions will bring MSU students and older Lansing area residents together in an effort to close the age gap which runs through American education. MSU students will meet once each week with the instructor during the regular class period, and with the instructor and Evening College students on Monday evenings. The course will be built around the theme of 'reformations' within various Oriental, Middle Eastern, and Western Religions. ... It is assumed, but not proven, that there will be common elements in religious reformations that will help the student relate his own (or his society's) religion(s) to religions otherwise quite different. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


RELIGION:
The Destruction of European Jewry: Historical Process and Theological After-Effects
Rabbi William Rudolph, Spring 1974

 
"...This course, taught by an instructor with rabbinic and doctoral training in historical and theological disciplines, will explore some of the most crucial aspects of the Holocaust. The actual process of extermination, from the expropriations and ghetto-ization to mobile killing operations and deportations and finally the concentration camps, will be dealt with on the basis of detailed primary and secondary sources.

Relevant to this discussion, an attempt will be made to delineate the influences responsible for Hitler's pathological hatred for the Jewish people, a hatred which provided the essential motivating power behind the exterminations. A second thrust of the course will be to investigate the effects of the Holocaust on those Jews who by circumstance were not victims. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


RELIGION:
Images of Women in the Judeo-Christian Tradition
Diane Deutsch, Spring 1974

 
"Identity formation is a process of identifying who we are based on awareness of our internal sense of self and on our awareness of what our culture expects us to be. Our inherited tradition, the Judeo-Christian, has been the bearer of patterns of expectations which every boy and girl child coming to adolescence must confront. This course will examine the Bible to discover these patterns of image and feminine motifs that have gone into producing western consciousness. Special emphasis will be placed on the creation stories and on the role of Mary in the New Testament. Extensive bibliographies will be available so that students cna explore and research creatively on their own images of women in post-biblical periods. These research papers will then be presented in the class."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


RELIGION:
Intimations of Immortality
Catherine Madsen McEvoy and Fred Graham, Spring 1974

 
"In a universe devoid of transcendence - Eliot's 'wasteland' - some writers insist that the way to the rediscovery of the mysterious and divine is not through preaching, door-to-door evangelizing, nor writing systematic theologies. Instead they try to touch and make real this Absence in our flatlands by way of their art, especially myth-making, poetry, drama, and the novel. T. S. Eliot and W. H. Auden come immediately to mind as exponents of this via dramatica. We shall read some of the products of this 'school' during the term, including Eliot, C. S. Lewis, Dante Alighieri, W. B. Yeats, and Charles Williams."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


SENIOR SEMINAR:  JMC 499:  (Overview)

 
At its inception, the JMC curriculum made provision for a senior or 'capstone' seminar to serve as the student's summarization of his / her educational experience. By the early 1970's, the capstone seminar had ceased to be a rigid requirement for JMC students.

On the other hand, the scanty documentary evidence indicates this course designation was employed for occasional topical seminars aimed at late-stage JMC students.

- Randy Whitaker (Editor)
 


SENIOR SEMINAR:  JMC 499:
Yesterday and Tomorrow: The Idea of Tragedy in Modern Thought
Hurrell, Wright, Johnson, Fall 1972

 
"For the first five weeks, class meetings will build upon literary, political and philosophical perspectives on tragedy developed in courses treating that theme by Professor Hurrell, Johnson and Wright. Enrollment in this coordinating seminar is limited to persons enrolled in at least one of the companion courses, Philosophy 232A ..., IDC Social Science 259A ... or Literature 231A ... .

Exploring alternative points of view, the class will focus on modern political, philosophical and literary events and attitudes that have dramatized conflicting views of modern man. Results of this conflict have often led to what has been labelled progress; other results have led to events labelled tragic. It will be the aim of this seminar to analyze some fo these conflicts that took place 'yesterday', and may be forthcoming 'tomorrow'.

NOTE: The sequence of topics for the first five weeks will provide a basis for individual and/or group study which will continue during the remainder of the term.

There will be one textbook for the seminar: Charles I. Glicksberg, The Tragic Vision in Twentieth Century Literature.

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


SOCIAL SCIENCE: (Series and Title Unknown)
Instructor Unknown, 1967

 
"In 1967 or so I took a Social Science course for which I did a survey of Phillips residents regarding cultural relativism and cultural universals. Luckily for me a good percentage of my fellow residents filled it out and put it in my box!"

- Julie Leininger (Pycior), October 2003
 


SOCIOLOGY:  JMC 250A:  (Overview)

 
"Study in the disciplines of sociology with selected periods, cultures, topics, and schools. Students may re-enroll once with a different instructor or topic."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


SOCIOLOGY:
Dynamics of Underprivileged Communities
Alex Cade, Spring 1966

 
"I also took a sociology course from Dr. Cade in the spring of 66.

I don't remember a whole lot. It was a sociology course and we went to Detroit one day on a field trip and visited Recorder's Court. For someone from a small farm community in southwestern Michigan it was a real eye opener."

- Suzanne Sheldon (Levy), 2003
 


SOCIOLOGY:
Human Sexuality
Sandra Warden, Fall 1972

 
"Class discussions will focus on the social psychological aspects of a broad definition of sexuality which includes what it means to be masculine / feminine, norms of sexual behavior, changing gender roles, the future of the family, and interpersonal relationships between men and women that are not necessarily genital in content. Emphasis will be given to the special problems of college-age adults in our society.

The text is expected to fill in any gaps in the knowledge you already possess of the basic physiological / anatomical aspects of human sexual behavior and reproduction. It will form the basis of discussion and study in the early days of the course. The instructor's role, after the first few sessions, will be that of resource person, discussion participant and moderator. Each student will be expected to study a selected sub-topic in depth then lead a well prepared and organized discussion session on his chosen topic. Regular attendance is expected and forms part of the basis for evaluation. We may subdivide the class into small groups.

Text: McCary, James Leslie, Human Sexuality. Supplemental readings will be on reserve in the JMC library. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


SOCIOLOGY:
Metamorphosis of a Rhinoceros
Sandra Warden, Fall 1972

 
"Is individualism still livable? Must the individual succumb before intensified social tensions? How can the individual make decisions on questions of personal, national and international concern?

Centering in the problem of individual decision making in our complex worlds, this course takes a look at individualism as a key topic in which many of the crucial problems of the present are brought to a focus. Most of us know the frustration of the search for answers, and how easily it leads to rage on the one hand or apathy on the other. The course does not promise answers, but explores the view that meaningful decisions can be made. The class will generate decision problems, analyzing and formulating modes of response and possible action.

Texts: Gross and Osterman, Invididualism: Man in Modern Society..., Ionesco, Eugene, Rhinoceros ..., May Rolloa, Man's Search for Himself..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972
 


SOCIOLOGY:
Internal Colonialism
Thomas Nowak, Fall 1972 / Fall 1973

 
"While the large majority of developing nations achieved their independence in the last three decades, many of the people are still 'colonialized' by their own national elites.

This course will focus on the psychological, cultural and structural aspects of the dependent syndromes characteristic of colonial relationships. Class lectures and discussions will contrast three types of cases -- those in which there were no changes, those in which elites changed but patterns of dependency were not altered and those in which changes in elites actually affected patterns of dependency.

Reading includes: Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth and O. Mannoni's Prospero and Caliban. Each student will focus on some concrete case of dependency and examine the usefulness of concepts presented and discussed in class for shedding light on the case."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1972

"This seminar is a conceptual and substantive introduction to certain aspects of social and political control and dependence. While the majority of people in the world today have achieved national independence, many remain colonized by their own elites. Similarly, while the majority of people in Western societies enjoy political freedom, many remain colonized within institutions such as prisons, asylums, etc. The first part of the course examines the economic, social, and cultural roots of traditional and contemporary forms of colonization. The second part of the course examines the process of colonization -- how men became dependent and how they can become less so. Examples will be drawn both from the Third World and American Society. The course will have a lecture-discussion format.

Readings from: Achebe, Monnoni, Fanon, Blauner"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


SOCIOLOGY:
Social Stratification: Class, Status and Power
Thomas Nowak, Fall 1973

 
"The basic question raised in this course is 'Who gets what, when, and why?' We will explore this question through a critical review of many of the principal social explanations of inequality in human life. Readings and discussion will focus upon: (1) alternative explanations of inequality; (2) current trends in inequality; (3) sources of change in the structure of inequality; (4) alternative social arrangements and possibilities. The course will have a lecture-discussion format.

Readings from: Marx, Weber, Dahrendorf, Lenski, Bell."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Fall 1973
 


SOCIOLOGY:
Problems: Personal, Social, Sociological
Vivian Hixson, Winter 1974

 
"This course has two objectives: (1) to help the student find answers to questions that most concern him as an individual, and (2) to give the student the ability to judge the strengths, weaknesses and limitations of varoius kinds of methods and theories in sociology. The organization of the course is based on two important discoveries of psychology and sociology: first, that an individual tends to retain only that information that is useful to him over a long period of time, and secondly, that both the quality of a person's knowledge and his desire to learn are related to his integration into a supporting social group. In light of these principles, only the first part of the course will be taught from a common text, as students learn some of the basic concepts and methods in sociology. After that, the students will divide into research and discussion groups based upon their common interests. Here, students will inform each other, exploring and forumulating questions, exchanging information, and trying to help each other develop a better understanding of the problems. In order to make sure that groups will be possible, Section 1 and Section 2 will discuss different problems. Before enrolling, the student should make sure that he is enrolling in a section that will interest him. There will be one examination early in the course, covering basic theory and methods. At the end of the course, each student will be responsible for a paper. This can be a report of an individual or group research project, or it can be an analysis and discussion of the reading that the student has chosen to do during the second half of the course. ...

Section 1 wil include groups exploring problems of courtship, marriage and the family; deviant behavior (for example, insanity, violence, crime); education (for example, the growth of the student sub-culture); and religion (for example, the relationship of organized religion to social change, as in the field of civil rights.

Section 2 will include groups discussing stratification (social classes, the distribution of wealth, the influence of social class background on values, life-chances, and personal problems; race and ethnic divisions, etc.); political sociology (types of political systems, problems of political participation, social movements, revolutions, etc.); and economic life (occupations, industrial organizations, etc.)"

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


SOCIOLOGY:
Social Movements: Women, Youth and Social Change
Thomas Nowak, Spring 1974

 
"The women's movement assaults established culture in a more penetrating way than either the counterculture or what remains of the New Left....

In this course we examine the bases for discontent among youth and women, and the ways in which each group has responded to its discontent. We will investigate why the women's movement is likely to be both more durable and have a more profound impact than the youth politics of the late 1960's. Finally, we examine the extent to which contemporary communes offer potential solutions for women and youth. That is, can communes be more than simply 'psychic' filling stations to relieve temporary disorientation in a mass culture?

Four weeks of the course will be devoted to the study of women. Most of these readings will be drawn from Juliet Mitchell, Women's Estate and Robin Morgan, ed., Sisterhood is Powerful. The section on youth (2 weeks) relies largely on Richard Flacks' Youth and Social Change and in our analysis of communes we will read portions of Rosabeth Kanfer's Commitment and Community."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 


STUDIES IN COMPOSITION: JMC 410 (Overview)

 
"Intensive individual and seminar instruction in advanced composition."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974
 


STUDIES IN COMPOSITION: JMC 410
Katherine McCracken; John Schroeder, Winter 1974

 
"This course will provide training in writing and editing. It will include descriptions and illustrations of specific techniques for improving expository writing. A student will write about 6,000 words of original work: several short papers (three to five pages, typed and double spaced), followed by several long papers (six to ten pages). The choice of topics will be left largely to the student, but all work will be basically expository. The course will include at least one individual conference. The classes will often be conducted like seminars, with students periodically criticizing each other's work."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Winter 1974

"Designed primarily for juniors, seniors, and master's candidates. ... Provides detailed examples of how shifting and changing sentence elements can improve clarity and force. ..."

- JMC Course Descriptions, Spring 1974
 

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